Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Via Whatever--- Does Book Touring Still Matter?

Does Book Touring Still Matter?

Via Carolyn Jewel--- The Flush Pile – An Author’s Perspective

The Flush Pile – An Author’s Perspective

Via Dear Author-- Ellora’s Cave v Dear Author Update

Ellora’s Cave v Dear Author Update

Via Disabled World-- Immune System Key in Fight Against Cancer

Immune System Key in Fight Against Cancer

Via Monday Markets for Writers: No Fees, Paying Gigs

 Sorry about the sharing delay.....

Monday Markets for Writers: No Fees, Paying Gigs

Monday, September 29, 2014

CT Scan---Completed

We are finally home. Sandi did her CT Scan and  hydration deal with something else bags before and afterwards with no issues. The Doctor should have the results in 48 to 72 hours.

There are more than 200 e-mails in my inbox right now. I'm in very bad shape. So, if you sent me somehing and are awaiting a response please be patient.

Review: "The Girl Who Wanted To Be Sherlock Holmes" by Bill Crider

As a junior at Harry Whittington high School, Ralph Markley, has enough going on every day without any complications.  Things have enough a tendency to happen to him and he gets blamed a lot.  It really isn’t his fault. He just is in the wrong place at the wrong time and because of that gets blamed for stuff.

Of course, before now, he had never picked up a section of pipe that had blood and maybe something more on it. If he hadn’t tripped over it, he would not have picked it up. Of course, if he hadn’t gone into the school boiler room in the first place he would not have discovered the body of Oscar Mullen who worked on maintenance for the school. If none of that had happened Ralph Markely would not have been standing there near the body while holding the murder weapon when a number of campus security folks arrived on scene.

Now that he is in trouble and with accusations swirling around him it is a good thing that his childhood friend, Shirley Holmes, is around to help him.  Shirley is not only beautiful and smart as Ralph has started to notice, but she is also is sure that she is related to the fictional Sherlock Holmes. Because of that belief she is sure the case of who killed Oscar and why won’t be solved unless she, Ralph, and their friends Reed and Franny uncover the truth. Before long the kids are at work and the suspect list grows longer in a delightful read.

The Girl Who Wanted To Be Sherlock Holmes is a fun young adult read that also works well for adults. Especially the secondary storyline of Ralph’s father who writes men’s adventure books that discerning readers realize are a bit more literary than they appear by covers and titles. Interesting characters, a case with a lot of suspects, and interesting secondary storylines make this another excellent read from Texas author Bill Crider. One worthy of your attention just like all his other books.


The Girl Who Wanted To Be Sherlock Holmes
Bill Crider
Self-Published
April 2011
ASIN: B004WKQJGS
E-Book
147 Pages
$2.99


The author supplied a word file for my use in an objective review.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2014

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Via PW-- Lee Child On Why He Signed with Authors United

As we have learned the hard way with my son's store that Amazon closed a month ago over three customers who filed multiple complaints over allegedly defective products they still have not returned, having all your eggs in the Amazon basket is a very bad idea long term. They are still reviewing the situation I fully detailed here. The only reason I am an Amazon Associate after what they have done to Karl is simply because we need every single penny. Medical debt and other money issues continue to worsen and Amazon's actions with Karl's store have really hurt us badly.


Lee Child On Why He Signed with Authors United


Amazon can and will turn off the pipeline any time they want. While e-books and Amzon have clearly helped a great number of authors--including myself-- there are no assurances what they will do in the future as they control more and more of the publishing landscape as well as the retail world.


In case you are interested Karl is now on e-Bay. Anything in his store at Amazon is available --despite their posted nonsense--- and some of those items have made it to e-Bay. Anything else that has not gotten there yet can be ordered directly from him if you so desire. He often passes on the savings when folks order direct.

If you send me an e-mail I can help you get what you need or want.

Bill Crider Has Read One-- He Beats Me (Again)

10 Best Historical Novels

Via Mystery Fanfare: 2014 Shamus Award Nominees

Mystery Fanfare: 2014 Shamus Award Nominees: The Private Eye Writers of America announced the finalists for its 2014 Shamus Awards . Winners will be named during a banquet at...

Background On An Upcoming Review--- "The Girl Who Wanted To Be Sherlock Holmes" by Bill Crider

I have written before here about  how I go about writing a review in longhand, Scott or sometimes Sandi (if she feels well enough) types it for me, and then I go back  over the review and edit. I think doing things that way works out for a better review.

As part of that editing process after I am happy with what I wrote, I usually go read a bunch of reviews to see what other folks have said about the material. If a number of folks mention the same thing-- as happened recently with Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child that was reviewed here-- I consider whether or not to mention it in my review. I also go poking around to see what else is out there on the book. If there is a back story I always read that.

Such was the case here by way of Ed Gorman's excellent blog. One you should be reading if you are not already. I found on his blog a post  written by Bill Crider back in late April 2011 explaining the backstory behind The Girl Who Wanted To Be Sherlock Holmes.  You ought to go read it and can do so here.

Back when I was doing Sample Sunday deals here on the blog, Bill contributed Chapter One of the book and you can read that here if you like.

The book is a good one and I review it here on the blog tomorrow.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

KRL This Week Update-- Denise Hamilton, Victoria Abbott, Josie Belle, Coming Attractions, short story, giveaways & much more in KRL

As posted elsewhere earlier today....

Up this weekend in Kings River Life Magazine reviews & giveaways of 4 more Penguin mysteries- "Marked Down for Murder" by Josie Belle, "Murder of a Needled Knitter" by Denise Swanson, "Nightmares Can Be Murder": A Dream Club Mystery by Mary Kennedy, and "The Wolfe Widow": A Book Collector Mystery by Victoria Abbott http://kingsriverlife.com/09/27/more-september-penguin-mysteries/

Also up a review & giveaway of "Mistress of Lies" by Holly West along with an interesting interview with Holly http://kingsriverlife.com/09/27/mistress-of-lies-by-holly-west/


And we have the latest mystery Coming Attractions by Sunny Frazier which includes a giveaway of the latest mystery from Nancy J Coco http://kingsriverlife.com/09/27/coming-attractions-fall-mystery-reading-suggestions/

For those who also enjoy fantasy we have a review and giveaway of "Black Water", a Jane Yellowrock short story collection by Faith Hunter http://kingsriverlife.com/09/27/black-water-a-jane-yellowrock-short-story-collection-by-faith-hunter/

And a review & giveaway of "Codex Born" (a mystery series involving a librarian) by Jim C. Hines http://kingsriverlife.com/09/27/codex-born-by-jim-c-hines/

And lastly over on KRL Lite we have a review of "The Bad Wife" by Jacqueline Seewald
http://kingsriverlife.blogspot.com/2014/09/the-bad-wife-by-jacqueline-seewald.html

Happy reading,
Lorie

--
KRL is now selling advertising & we have special discounts for
mystery authors & bookstores! Ask me about it!
Mystery section in Kings River Life http://KingsRiverLife.com
Check out my own blog at http://mysteryratscloset.blogspot.com/

Via Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Free for Kindle for a Limited Time--Hawthorne: Tales of a Weirder West

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Free for Kindle for a Limited Time: Hawthorne: Tales of a Weirder West - Kindle edition by Heath Lowrance. Literature & Fiction Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com. : There are mons...

Via The Digital Reader-- Ellora’s Cave Sues Dear Author Book Blog for Defamation

Ellora’s Cave Sues Dear Author Book Blog for Defamation

Senior News Newspaper Book Review Column-- September 2014

For my monthly newspaper book review column in the Senior News Newspaper, I usually make sure to choose one fiction and one nonfiction book in the hopes of interesting more readers. For September I went with The Contractors by local area resident Harry Hunsicker who I have been a  huge fan of since reading his first book, Still River. For the non-fiction book I went with Playing with Stencils: Exploring Repetition, Pattern, and Personal Designs by Amy Rice. For a number of years before Sandi had cancer she did a lot of stencil work. These days her eyes as well as her hand/eye coordination won’t allow it, but she still looks at the books when I bring them home for use in the column and on the blog. Longer reviews of both were run here on the blog earlier this year and can easily be found by clicking on the above book titles.

Included below are the relevant book covers for my September 2014 column…  



The Contractors: A Thriller
Harry Hunsicker
Thomas & Mercer (Amazon)
ISBN-13: 978-1477808726
E-Book (available in paperback and audio)
514 Pages

Anyone who has read the Lee Henry Oswald series by Harry Hunsicker knows that the author does not write the Dallas Chamber of Commerce ad copy type of books. Bad things happen to all on the streets of Dallas in his books. The Contractors: A Thriller raises that bar to all new levels.

While nearly everyone has heard of the private contractors working in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere overseas, they also are working here at home. Jon Cantrell and Piper are contractors for the DEA as well as being romantically involved. As the book opens, they are on the trail of Lisa, a missing 14 year old teenager. Hired by a retired crooked cop named Sinclair they need to find the girl and get her back home. Not only will that get them paid, it will allow them to focus on another job where their violent skills will be put to the test.

Those who expect a serious mystery in the style of the excellent Lee Henry Oswald series will be disappointed in The Contractors: A Thriller. This is a fast paced action orientated novel where nearly everyone has very few redeeming qualities. A thriller in every sense of the word where character development is limited and told in occasional bursts of backstory to give readers a break from the frenetic forward pace. The Contractors: A Thriller by Harry Hunsicker takes readers on a violent and bloody rampage from one end of Texas to the other in a read that constantly twists and turns in ways that should keep readers hooked to the very end.




Playing with Stencils: Exploring Repetition, Pattern, and Personal Designs
Amy Rice
Quarry Books (Quayside Publishing Group)
ISBN# 978-1-59253-829-4
Paperback
144 Pages

Playing with Stencils: Exploring Repetition, Pattern, and Personal Designs by Amy Rice features variety in design of others while teaching readers how to go about creating their own personal touches in various projects. Along with plenty of information there are a number of photographs depicting the various ideas covered in the book.

Broken into three main sections along with several resource sections the book features projects that go from floor to table and runs the gamut. While skill level is not addressed in this 145 page book it is clear that like any other art form patience and practice will be needed to perfect the image you are trying to create. This is a good resource featuring plenty of colorful projects to help you get started while also providing plenty of inspiration.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2014

Friday, September 26, 2014

Via Tapir and Friends Animal Store--- Sandi's Chemo Hats and Walker Caddies



Via The Non-Gamer's Gamer's Blog: Injustice

The Non-Gamer's Gamer's Blog: Injustice: I like games with superheroes, mostly because I'm a big comic book geek. Injustice: Gods Among Us is therefore my jam. You've ...

Via Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: New Western Fiction E-Zine

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: New Western Fiction E-Zine: Check It Out:   Welcome to Saddlebag Dispatches , Where Stories Of The West Come To Be Told. If you like stories of the Old West, you’ve c...

Via Mike Monson's Blog-- Sneak Peak of Tussinland — Coming October 7 From All Due Respect Books

I really enjoyed Mike's THE SCENT OF NEW DEATH as well as WHAT HAPPENS IN RENO when I read and reviewed them earlier this year. Mike has a blog and has announced his new  full length novel at...

Via A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: OUR STATE FAIR IS A GREAT STATE FAIR!

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: OUR STATE FAIR IS A GREAT STATE FAIR!: Here we are with Fall begun and in Texas, that means the State Fair. Personally, I love the fair and hate to miss it this year because of r...

FFB Review: "A Werewolf Named Wayne" by Bill Crider

Friday means Friday’s Forgotten Books hosted by Patti Abbott. Having read and reviewed A Vampire NamedFred by Bill Crider last week it seemed appropriate to do the second in the series this week. Like the previous book this one is  a fun read that works for all ages making it very much worth your time. Seems to me the author should start working on the rest of the creatures of the night series with A Zombie Named Bruce coming next….


A Werewolf Named Wayne

Readers who have read A Vampire Named Fred are well aware that Hermie and Al helped Fred and his assistant, Carl, with a couple of issues. While Kermit felt it wasn’t easy being green, being a vampire in these times of extreme prejudice caused by bogus Hollywood movies isn’t easy. Not to mention the fact that cats don’t like vampires and will come by the hundreds to the home and yowl in the yard. Neighbors don’t like that sort of thing.

Thanks to Hermie and Al’s friendship and efforts, things are far better for Fred and Carl these days. So much so they are moving to Vegas and that means the house has been sold again. Al and Hermie are really going to miss Fred and Carl. But, people as well as the creatures of the night move on when circumstances change. Fred has made it clear to the new owner how helpful the boys were and that is a good thing. The new owner is Wayne and he is a werewolf. Good thing the boys are in 7th grade now as he needs their help with a far more complicated problem than Fred ever had.

While not as humorous as the previous book, this is another very good read that will appeal to both adults and kids alike. Wayne’s issues are far different than Fred and his concerns are far different. With characters and expectations firmly established in the preceding book, A Werewolf Named Wayne focuses primarily on his unique situation and the help he needs. The result is a very good fun read that keeps the adventure going.



A Werewolf Named Wayne
Bill Crider
Delabarre Publishing
July 2011
ASIN# B005EM9L4U
E-Book
71 Pages
$1.99


Material was picked up during a recent author promotion for my use in an objective review.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2014

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Via Sea Minor-- One Man's Opinion: THE BLUE SWEETHEART by DAVID GOODIS

One Man's Opinion: THE BLUE SWEETHEART by DAVID GOODIS

Via Crime Watch: 9mm: An interview with JA Jance

Crime Watch: 9mm: An interview with JA Jance: One of my favourite things about being a keen reader is discovering new-to-me authors who have written many books that I haven't tried...

Via Texas State Historical Association --- Get the Texas Almanac eBook - Free!

Get the Texas Almanac eBook - Free!

Via Rough Edges: Now Available: Outlaw Ranger - James Reasoner

Rough Edges: Now Available: Outlaw Ranger - James Reasoner: G.W. Braddock was raised to be a Texas Ranger and never wanted anything else. But when he's stripped of his badge through no fault of...

Review: "A Case of Noir" by Paul D. Brazill

A Case of Noir by Paul D. Brazil takes readers on a dark and twisted road through five chapters. Even though each one is a fairly contained short story, the five chapters link together to form a complex tale featuring Luke Case.

Except his name isn’t really Luke Case. Not that readers know that as the first installment, “Red Esperanto” opens. Instead, readers know it is Warsaw in winter and our narrator prefers Jack Daniels with Coke only after he is so drunk already that he shouldn’t be drinking at all, a Ukrainian hooker by the name of Tatiana, and hanging out with a fellow ex-pat by the name of Sean Bradley. Sean has his reasons why he drinks heavily as does Luke and their lives are going to be intertwined as the months and pages pass.

It is while with Sean in their favorite watering hole, “Rory’s Irish Pub” that the stunning C. J. walked in very late one night. Known as Crazy Jola, she is the wife of Robert Mohawk who is a mid-level a gangster of some repute. Despite being warned off about his reputation as well as hers, Luke manages to talk her into a drink and eventually quite a lot more.

Considering his past, he should have stopped while he was ahead. A Case of Noir is a complicated stylistic read full of visual imagery that moves across Europe adding and dropping people and clues as it goes. While Luke Case has a fake name and a fake cover he has his vices no matter what and that means he leaves a trail in his wake. A complicated dark trail as strikingly depicted on the cover with the maze and one that isn’t at all easy to figure out from start to finish. 


A Case of Noir
Paul D. Brazill
Lite Editions
ISBN# 978-8866655053
May 2014
Paperback (also available e-book)
134 Pages
$8.99

E-book version supplied by the author some time ago in exchange for my objective review.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2014

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Via Mystery Fanfare: Crime Fiction during the Days of Awe

Mystery Fanfare: Crime Fiction during the Days of Awe: The Jewish calendar is lunar, and Rosh Hashana, the beginning of the Jewish New Year, begins this Wednesday night. The Days of Awe are th...

Via...Hey, There's A Dead Guy In The Living Room--- A freelance's lot is not a simple one

A freelance's lot is not a simple one

Review: "Piano Man" by Bill Crider

Originally published in the excellent anthology, On Dangerous Ground: Stories of Western Noir, Bill Crider’s very good and very dark tale “Piano Man” is now available as a short story. Somewhere near Fort Laramie in the year 1880 there sits a place known as the “Bad Dog Saloon.” It is the home for a man who forsook nearly everything else because of the booze. He is known as the “piano man” and most don’t pay any attention to him in the corner of the saloon as their focus is on drinking, gambling, and the whores.

Then, in the wake of a card game that went very wrong for at least one of the participants he got an idea. It wasn’t a particularly good idea, but it took over and slowly became an obsession. An obsession, much like his obsession with alcohol, is going to change everything.



Bill Crider
Brash Books
2014
ASIN: B00KAJX6J8
E-Book
17 Pages
$0.99


Material was picked up during a recent author promotion for my use in an objective review.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2014

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Proving The Point.....

Proving the point that two heads are always better than one.....

Scott and I






















and that one needs to be aware at all times what your wife may be doing to distract you from working on a review.....


Via Sea Minor--- One Man's Opinion: UNDERCOVER by GERARD BRENNAN

One Man's Opinion: UNDERCOVER by GERARD BRENNAN

Via Digital Book Wire-- The Content Flood and Authors Whining by Bob Mayer


The Content Flood and Authors Whining by Bob Mayer

Review: "Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel" by Lee Child

Jack Reacher was on the west coast when it happened. A sniper, loose in Paris, took a shot at the President of France. The shot was fired from 1400 yards out by someone on an apartment balcony. Some kind of new glass held saving the life of the politician. As the situation was investigated and the reality of just how difficult a shot it was to pull off a list of potential snipers with that kind of skill level was drawn up by those who should know.

It has been determined that several snipers from around the world are the best of the best for this particular situation. One sniper in particular is an American that that Reacher knows well having put him in jail a number or years ago. As the intelligence services of the various countries are brought in to chase their sniper in advance of the upcoming G8 summit in England, old contracts of Reacher’s put him in to help with this as he owes a favor to one of those heavily involved.  Just one of the ways-- and there are several-- that this situation is Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel.

Reacher is back and in good form in this latest installment of the long running series. Duplicity is rampart among all involved as there are many hidden agendas are at work in this complex thriller. Reacher spends a lot of time talking to people by way of the Socratic method to sift through the conflicting information and figure out multiple situations as they arise throughout the entire book. This is done through page after page of dialogue in a way that is far different stylistically than earlier books in the series.

In fact the entire novel, while good, is far different stylistically and not just in terms of dialogue than earlier in the series. Legendary for his traveling light with only a toothbrush--if that-- resulting in needing to buy clothes to replace whatever he is wearing, this Reacher hardly ever buys clothes. In previous novels, Reacher was always interested in the girl and almost always got her. In this case there is zero sexual attraction at work as he acts more like her grandfather or mentor.  Considering the age of his parents Reacher could be her grandfather and yet he can still fight like the Reacher of old in the few fight scenes scattered throughout the novel. One of which immediately puts the reader in mind of the classic movie Bond villain, Jaws.

Reacher, often dealing with characters that are little more than stereotypes, when the time comes is still busting heads and/or various limbs while taking names as the chase takes him across the globe. He certainly isn’t mellowing with age and gets the job done-- even when the odds are stacked against him by both friend and foe. While not nearly as good as early ones in the series, Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child is a good one that keeps reader interest page after page and is certainly much better than his last couple of books.


Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel
Lee Child
Delacorte Press (Penguin Random House LLC)
September 2014
ISBN# 978-0-8041-7874-7
Hardback (available in e-book and audio)
368 Pages
$28.00


ARC was provided as a result of my winning a copy by way of LibraryThing for my use in an objective review.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2014

Monday, September 22, 2014

Banned Books Week

Again the local media is reporting various stories regarding banned books in the local area districts. I'm tempted to get up on the old soapbox and point out the stupidity of all of this and the fact that maybe one should read what their kids read and discuss it with them, but I have a feeling anyone that reads this blog is part of the choir pointing out the stupidity.




Beat To A Pulp Latest Story--- "The Debutante Ball" by Clare Toohey

Via Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: The Girl Who Wanted to be Sherlock Holmes


Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: The Girl Who Wanted to be Sherlock Holmes: The Girl Who Wanted to be Sherlock Holmes :  In my continuing effort to become incredibly rich, I'm trying to gin up some sales for this...

Via Monday Markets for Writers: No Fees, Paying Gigs

Monday Markets for Writers: No Fees, Paying Gigs

Sunday, September 21, 2014

RTE Update--- Sept. 20 issue of RTE

As posted elsewhere earlier today.....

The current issue of RTE, out on September 20th, includes fifteen new reviews as well as a new interview:
http://www.reviewingtheevidence.com

Plus

John Florio  in the 'Sixty seconds with . . .' interview hot seat:

http://www.reviewingtheevidence.com/interviews.html?id=187


Reviews this week:

TITLE                    AUTHOR                REVIEWER

TITLE                    AUTHOR                REVIEWER

THE PAYING GUESTS    Sarah Waters        Yvonne Klein       
When Frances Wray lets rooms to a married couple, she only expects much needed revenue, but her life and that of the Barbers becomes closely intertwined.

BLIND MOON ALLEY    John Florio        Diana Borse       
Jersey Leo is an albino, a man for Aaron Garvey who protected him from bullying through school. Garvey escapes from prison just before he is to be executed and now the cops are beating on anyone who knows him; Jersey is, of course, hiding him.

THE CHILDREN ACT        Ian McEwan    Yvonne Klein   
High Court Judge Fiona Maye, who presides over family court cases, must decide whether the adolescent son of Jehovah's Witnesses may be transfused against his and his parents' wishes in order to treat his leukemia. Her judgement affects not only the boy, but herself as well.

REMAINS OF INNOCENCE     J. A. Jance        Cathy Downs       
A young man with cognitive disabilities is found murdered and tortured, then the medical examiner of Cochise County is discovered in his home, tortured to death.

MURMURS OF INSANITY    Gerrie Ferris Finger     Sharon Mensing       
Dru helps one of Lake's relatives who is a person of interest in a college student's disappearance and potential murder while a performance art troupe wreaks havoc on the investigation

SORROW BOUND    David Mark    Barbara Fister       
It's hot in Hull and Detective Sergeant Aector McAvoy has a feeling that the exceptionally brutal murder of a middle-aged woman may be just the first.

MURDER IN RETRIBUTION    Ann Cleeland         PJ Coldren       
Newlywed Detective Constable Kathleen Doyle adjusts to her new marital status and pregnancy while working on a very complicated case which may or may not involve her husband, Chief Inspector Michael Acton.

THE LONG WAY HOME    Louise Penny    Ann Pearson       
When Peter Morrow fails to return from his yearlong separation to his wife, Clara, she enlists the help of Armand Gamache in finding him on a trip that leads to the Lower North Shore of the St Lawrence River and beyond.

THE HEIST    David Silva        Anne Corey       
When his friend discovers a brutal murder, Gabriel Allon is recruited to track down not only the killer but also a stolen masterpiece and in doing so uncovers a money trail that leads directly to one of the world's worst dictators.

EVIL IN RETURN    Weyman Jones     Sharon Mensing   
A woman is kidnapped by a Native American seeking to avenge historical wrongs.

HAUNTED    Randy Wayne White        Megan Sweeney   
Hannah Smith is asked to help prove development property is stigmatized and unmarketable.

MARGERY ALLINGHAM'S MR. CAMPION’S FAREWELL  Completed by Mike Ripley Jim Napier
Mike Ripley completes an unfinished MS left starring Albert Campion that takes him from a small village to Monte Carlo.

THE LATE SCHOLAR    Jill Paton Walsh    Caryn St Clair       
A college in Oxford is faced with selling a treasured manuscript or financial ruin. As the college's new Visitor, Lord Peter is summoned to help resolve the issue.

PRISON NOIR     Joyce Carol Oates, ed    Lourdes Venard       
A collection of 15 short stories presents a new perspective on prison literature from those who know what it's like on the inside.

CONVERSION    Katherine Howe    Ben Neal       
The girls at St Joan's boarding school are exhibiting symptoms like the girls in early 18th century Salem that resulted in the witch trials. What is going on?

We post more than 900 new reviews a year -- all of them are archived on the site -- as well as a new interview with a top author every issue.

Yvonne Klein
Editor: ymk@reviewingtheevidence.com

Via LRHallBooks: Summer Short Story Spectacular, Season 1, Episode ...

LRHallBooks: Summer Short Story Spectacular, Season 1, Episode ...: With this blog, the Summer Short Story Spectacular ends.  Season 1 has come to a close.   Tuesday marks the Fall Equinox, a beautiful time o...

Via Lesa's Book Critiques--- It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown...Lee Mendelson

It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown...Lee Mendelson

Via Mystery Fanfare: Deanston Scottish Crime Novel of the Year

Mystery Fanfare: Deanston Scottish Crime Novel of the Year: Hats Off to Peter May, winner of the Deanston Scottish Crime Novel of the Year for Entry Island was announced tonight at Bloody Scotland ...

Buy My Book--Please!

That is the heart of it.....buy my book......Please!


My short fiction has appeared in magazines such as Lynx Eye, Starblade, Show and Tell, and The Writer's Post Journal among others and online at such places as Mouth Full Of Bullets, Crime And Suspense, Mysterical-e, and others.


I am the author of Mind Slices and a contributor to the Carpathian Shadows, Volume II anthology at http://www.amazon.com/Kevin-Tipple/e/B009Q5J8T4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1 and other platforms.


The books are good and both the publisher in the case of Carpathian Shadows II and me with the other could really use some sales. So, buy my book--please!

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Via Sea Minor-- One Man's Opinion: STIFFED by ROB KITCHIN

One Man's Opinion: STIFFED by ROB KITCHIN

KRL This Week Update--- More food mysteries, Jan Christensen, Sue McGinty, new mystery TV shows, mystery short story, giveaways & more in KRL

As posted elsewhere earlier today.....

Up this morning in Kings River Life Magazine a mystery short story by Barry Wiley http://kingsriverlife.com/09/20/the-cry-of-sister-angel-a-john-randall-brown-mystery-short-story/

Also up, reviews & giveaways of 3 more fun food mysteries-"Death is Like a Box of Chocolates": A Chocolate Covered Mystery by Kathy Aarons, "Rebel Without a Cake" by Jacklyn Brady and "The Wedding Soup Murder" by Rosie Genova http://kingsriverlife.com/09/20/september-penguin-food-mysteries/

And a review & giveaway of "Lost Legacy" by Annette Dashofy http://kingsriverlife.com/09/20/lost-legacy-by-annette-dashofy/

We also have a look at some of the new TV shows premiering this month --including several interesting looking mystery ones like "How To Get Away With Murder" and "The Mysteries of Laura" http://kingsriverlife.com/09/20/five-september-tv-premieres-to-watch/

And we have a review & giveaway of "Blackout" by Jan Christensen http://kingsriverlife.com/09/20/blackout-by-jan-christensen/

And a review and giveaway of "The Executioner's Hood" by Vickie Britton and Loretta Jackson http://kingsriverlife.com/09/20/the-executioners-hood-by-loretta-jackson-and-vickie-britton

And for those who also love fantasy, a review & giveaway of "Hidden" by Alex Jacka http://kingsriverlife.com/09/20/hidden-by-alex-jacka/

Lastly, over on KRL Lite a review & giveaway of "Murder in Mariposa" by Sue McGinty http://kingsriverlife.blogspot.com/2014/09/murder-in-mariposa-by-sue-mcginty.html
As always, all of these except the Lite one, and much more, can also be found by going to our home page and scrolling down http://KingsRiverLife.com

Happy Reading,
Lorie

--
KRL is now selling advertising & we have special discounts for
mystery authors & bookstores! Ask me about it!
Mystery section in Kings River Life http://KingsRiverLife.com
Check out my own blog at http://mysteryratscloset.blogspot.com/

Via Dean Wesley Smith-- Why I Haven’t Been Writing Many Publishing Blogs Lately

Why I Haven’t Been Writing Many Publishing Blogs Lately

Via WELCOME TO HELL ~ by Glenn Walker: Z Nation

WELCOME TO HELL ~ by Glenn Walker: Z Nation: If there's anything better than a movie by The Asylum, it would have to be a TV series by The Asylum, and "Z Nation," their...

Via Mystery Fanfare: Cartoon of the Day: Thesaurus

Mystery Fanfare: Cartoon of the Day: Thesaurus

Via Bookbrowsing--- Why You Promote With a Long Tail by C. Hope Clark

Why You Promote With a Long Tail by C. Hope Clark

Friday, September 19, 2014

Via Ericka Dreifus-- Friday Finds for Writers

Friday Finds for Writers

Sandi Update

Finally back home as they were running way behind. At this point, things seem relatively stabale so they have cut back her dosages on the steroids and a couple of other things. By doing this, it should help with her diabetes numbers so that just maybe--assuming insurance does not cause more issues--she can finally have the much needed PET Scan.

Extra blood was taken from her today so they can run some extra tests to look at various issues. The IVIG infusion went well once it goits started so that was also a good sign.

As it stands right now, we wait to hear on the PET Scan and her next appointment is a month from now on October 17 when she will have another full workup and IVIG infusion.

Sandi also got a real kick out of the fact that all of her hats she donated have again been taken and according to the nurses they were a huge hit.

FFB Review--- "A Vampire Named Fred" by Bill Crider

Friday means Friday’s Forgotten Books hosted by Patti Abbott. Having just read this earlier in the week the book seemed a perfect choice for FFB this week. A Vampire Named Fred by Bill Crider is a fun read that works for all ages making it very much worth your time.


A Vampire Named Fred

The very run down house next door had been on the market for about 15 years when it finally sold. Al, who is 12, loved exploring the old place, but his mom worried about rotted out floors, broken stairs, snakes in the basement, and the bugs and dirt. While his parents would not buy the old place like he wanted them to, at least his Mom never forbade him from going over there.  He had loved going over there and poking around as long as he could remember and often his buddy Hermie went over there with him.

So, Al wasn’t exactly thrilled when the house suddenly sold. Hermie was convinced nothing good for them would happen with the new owners. Hermie was sure the new owners had to be a 100 or something to want to live in that old place and he was sure they would not have grandkids or anything. They probably even hate kids, according to Hermie. Neither one of the boys counted on “A Vampire Named Fred” who needs their help and friendship.

Originally published in print on 1990 and released in electronic format in 2011, this book aimed at the middle school aged crowd is a very fun read. Not only does it play a bit with the vampire legend which Hollywood movies got very wrong according to Fred, the book also mixes in cultural references that will appeal to the adult reader. For example, Elvis (or somebody doing one heck of an impersonation) works down at the local Tastee Daree Freezee where they sell soft ice cream, burgers, and more. He still sings a bit and dances in his blue suede shoes while filling orders. While small things like that may fly by the kids, adults will get a chuckle or two over that and quite a number of other items in this fun story that reminds all readers that being a little different is okay.

“A Vampire Named Fred” is a fun read for all ages by legendary author Bill Crider. It has a sequel titled “A Werewolf Named Wayne.”



A Vampire Named Fred
Bill Crider
Delabarre Publishing
2011
ASIN: B00551J10Y
E-Book
127 Pages
$1.99


Material was picked up during a recent author promotion for my use in an objective review.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2014

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Probably True.....

.....though I won't look nearly as good doing it.......

 

Via The Thrill Begins: 5 Tips to Keep the Momentum of Thrillerfest Alive

The Thrill Begins: 5 Tips to Keep the Momentum of Thrillerfest Alive: by Ursula Ringham It’s been two months since I attended ITW ’s Thrillerfest. I’m back to my regular work routine in high tech and lif...

Via CriminalElement.com-- Steve McQueen: The King of Cool Westerns

Via SleuthSayers: Behind the Scenes

SleuthSayers: Behind the Scenes: Jackie Sherbow by Jackie Sherbow We SleuthSayers are very fond of the ladies at Dell’s mystery magazines. A name that often arises ...

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Via Tapir and Friends Animal Store (Realistic Stuffed Animals and Plastic Animals): Very Special Teddy Bears

Tapir and Friends Animal Store (Realistic Stuffed Animals and Plastic Animals): Very Special Teddy Bears

Via ESPN DFW-- Longhorns' David Ash won't return

Via Roger Packer-- Kindle Unlimited borrow rate slumps by 15% to $1.54 for August

Kindle Unlimited borrow rate slumps by 15% to $1.54 for August

Via Ed Gorman's blog: from Patricia Abbott-CONCRETE ANGEL

Ed Gorman's blog: from Patricia Abbott-CONCRETE ANGEL

Via Lesa's Book Critiques--- The Blood of an Englishman by M.C. Beaton

The Blood of an Englishman by M.C. Beaton

Monday, September 15, 2014

Lesa's Latest Contest--- Giveaway - M.C. Beaton's Agatha Raisin, The Blood of an Englishman

As posted elsewhere earlier today....

To celebrate M.C. Beaton's 25th Agatha Raisin mystery, The Blood of an Englishman, I'm giving away three copies, a finished one from the publisher, and two ARCs. Details are up at http://lesasbookcritiques.blogspot.com/2014/09/anniversary-giveaway-mc-beatons-blood.html . Entries from the U.S. only, please.


Lesa Holstine

Via Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Noircon Update

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Noircon Update: SOCIETY HILL PLAYHOUSE - 507 SOUTH 8TH STREET -   PHILADELPHIA PA. 19147 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE NOIRCON PROGRAM SET NOIRCON 2014 , a bien...

Via Monday Markets for Writers: No Fees, Paying Gigs

 Sorry this is being shared late today, but doctor visits have to come first.....

Monday Markets for Writers: No Fees, Paying Gigs

Back Home

Back home from the hospital as Sandi had an appointment with her endocrinologist today. While better than she was, Sandi is still nowhere near where she needs to be numbers wise not just for her health but the long delayed Pet Scan.The overall trend of her blood sugar numbers lowering seems to have basically leveled out as we thought. So, the insulin dosage is being raised a little more, but Sandi is having weigh gain and other issues related to the insulin.

Under consideration is the idea of adding some new medications to the mix in the hopes of lowering her numbers. However, that is being delayed for now as Sandi has an IVIG infusion Friday and a ton of blood work as the cancer docs plan on doing the tests to see if the IVIG is working. There were concerns that adding new drugs to her cocktail could throw off those results.

So, for now, she keeps doing what she is doing and fingers crossed that the downward numbers trend will start again.

Via The Corpse Steps Out: Another Series Continuation...

The Corpse Steps Out: Another Series Continuation...: Thomas Chastain agreed to continue the Perry Mason series with books written by him and approved by the estate. Chastain had been a newspa...

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Via Not The Baseball Pitcher---- The Empty Badge(Cash Laramie and Gideon Miles Book 8) – Wayne D. Dundee

The Empty Badge(Cash Laramie and Gideon Miles Book 8) – Wayne D. Dundee

Euro Crime Update-- New Reviews on Euro Crime: Arlidge, Daly, Duke, Furst, Kitson, Kreslehner, Mann, Phillips, Wilkinson

As posted elsewhere earlier today....

Here are nine reviews which have been added to the Euro Crime website today, three have appeared on the blog since last time, and six are completely new.

NB. You can keep up to date with 'Euro Crime' by following the blog and/or liking the Euro Crime Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/eurocrimewebsite).

New Reviews:

Michelle Peckham reviews M J Arlidge's second book featuring Southampton's DI Helen Grace, 'Pop Goes the Weasel';

Terry Halligan reviews Bill Daly's 'Black Mail' the first in the DCI Charlie Anderson series set in Glasgow;

Susan White reviews Simon Duke's debut 'Out of Bounds' which is set in the US;

Lynn Harvey reviews Alan Furst's 'Midnight in Europe' set in the late 1930s;

Terry also reviews Bill Kitson's 'Buried in the Past', the eighth in the DI Mike Nash series;

Michelle also reviews Austrian author Gabi Kreslehner's 'Rain Girl' tr. Lee Chadeayne;

Rich Westwood reviews George Mann's 'Sherlock Holmes - The Spirit Box';

Amanda Gillies reviews 'Last Kiss by Louise Phillips, the third in the Dr Kate Pearson set in and around Dublin

and Mark Bailey reviews Kerry Wilkinson's 'Crossing the Line', the eighth in the DI Jesica Daniel series set in Manchester.

http://www.eurocrime.co.uk/review_list.html or via the blog: http://eurocrime.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/reviews-arlidge-daly-duke-furst-kitson.html.

Previous reviews can be found in the review archive (http://www.eurocrime.co.uk/review_list.html)

Forthcoming titles can be found by author or date or by category, here (http://eurocrime.co.uk/future_releases.html) along with releases by year.

best wishes,
Karen M
@eurocrime

KRL This Week Update--- Kaye George, Dennis Palumbo, Endeavour, short story, giveaways & more in KRL

As posted elsewhere yesterday.....

Up this morning in Kings River Life Magazine a review & giveaway of the first in a brand new mystery series "Fat Cat at Large" by Janet Cantrell aka Kaye George along with a fun guest post from Janet about the cat that inspired the cat in her book http://kingsriverlife.com/09/13/fat-cat-at-large-by-janet-cantrell/

Also up, a review & giveaway of a new anthology put together by the New York Tri-State Chapter of Sisters-in-Crime, "Family Matters", which includes authors such as Elizabeth Zelvin, Triss Stein, Anita Page & many more http://kingsriverlife.com/09/13/family-matters-a-mystery-anthology-murder-new-york-style/

We also have a review & giveaway of the latest mystery by Dennis Palumbo "Phantom Limb" http://kingsriverlife.com/09/13/phantom-limb-a-daniel-rinaldi-mystery-by-dennis-palumbo/

And we have a fun mystery short story by Sharon Arthur Moore http://kingsriverlife.com/09/13/the-bloody-knife-a-mystery-short-story/

And a review by Bobbi Chukran of the mystery TV show "Endeavour" http://kingsriverlife.com/09/13/endeavour-tv-review/

For those of us who enjoy fantasy with our mystery, we have a review & giveaway of "Free Agent", a Grimm Agency novel by JC Nelson http://kingsriverlife.com/09/13/free-agent-by-j-c-nelson/

Lastly, over on KRL Lite we have a review & ebook giveaway of "Prescription For Murder" by E.E. Smith http://kingsriverlife.blogspot.com/2014/09/prescription-for-murder-by-e-e-smith.html
As always, you can find most of these and more by also going to our home page and scrolling down http://KingsRiverLife.com

Happy reading,
Lorie

--
KRL is now selling advertising & we have special discounts for
mystery authors & bookstores! Ask me about it!
Mystery section in Kings River Life http://KingsRiverLife.com
Check out my own blog at http://mysteryratscloset.blogspot.com/ 

Via Dear Author-- The Curious Case of Ellora’s Cave

The Curious Case of Ellora’s Cave

Via Bookbrowsing--- An interview with Ben Solomon

An interview with Ben Solomon

VIa DFW Writer's Workshop--- Five Reasons to Reconsider Before Self-Publishing

Via Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Free for Kindle for a Limited Time--THE EMPTY BADGE

 Read this very good story in the original anthology Trails of the Wild: Seven Tales of the Old West....
Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Free for Kindle for a Limited Time: The Empty Badge (Cash Laramie and Gideon Miles Book 8) - Kindle edition by Wayne D. Dundee. Literature & Fiction Kindle eBooks @ Amazon....

Friday, September 12, 2014

Via Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: FFB: Australian Vintage Paperback Guide -- Graeme ...

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: FFB: Australian Vintage Paperback Guide -- Graeme ...: Being interested in paperbacks, I naturally had to have a copy of this book.  My primary collecting (or accumulating) interest is in U.S. pa...

Via M. P. McDonald: Kindle Unlimited Becoming a Goldmine for Scam Arti...

 The same Amazon that had no problem shutting down my son's store over customer lies two plus weeks ago and is still considering the appeal, allows this????? What utter crap.

M. P. McDonald: Kindle Unlimited Becoming a Goldmine for Scam Arti...: As an author with books in Kindle Unlimited, I'm extremely worried about the scam artists who have sprung up in Kindle Unlimited like da...

Via Ericka Dreifus-- Friday Finds for Writers

Friday Finds for Writers

FFB Review: "The Toll House Murder" by Anthony Wynne--Guest Reviewer Patrick Ohl

Patrick Ohl is back this week for Friday Forgotten Books hosted by Patti Abbott. This week he is reviewing The Toll House Murder by Anthony Wynne.


 “Anthony Wynne” was the pseudonym of physician Robert McNair Wilson, who seems to have obsessed himself with impossible crimes of all sorts, though he never achieved the status of authors like John Dickson Carr or Clayton Rawson. And his book The Toll House Murder shows all too clearly why that is so.

The Toll House Murder begins promisingly, as we learn of the murder of Sir Andrew Burke, the wealthy man in charge of a famous shipping company. The circumstances are bizarre— Sir Andrew walks into a toll house to ask the man in charge to let him through. He re-enters his car and passes through the toll, but after a couple of hundred yards, the car swerves and tips over. As a result, the doors jam and have to be forced open. Sir Andrew is lying inside, stabbed through the heart— but there is no knife in the car, no other passenger, and no footprints anywhere in the snow around the car!

While this initial situation is intriguing, the interest is sucked out of the story pretty rapidly as we meet our cast of characters. And such a memorable bunch they are! I particularly remember… um… actually, I don’t remember anyone at all. This isn’t a joke- I literally don’t remember any of the characters. I don’t even remember the murderer’s name! I just remember what function some faceless cut-outs played in the plot. They have all the personality and charm of cardboard (though, on second thought, that would be an insult to a useful packaging material). I just finished reading the book not 10 minutes ago. That’s a bad sign.

And thus we get another problem with this book: while the plot may be interesting, it is so poorly paced that any interest is quickly removed. After the initial murder, we get about 70 pages where nothing happens. After this, we get a murder, and a few pages later an attempted murder. Nothing happens for another 70 pages or so, after which we get another murder, and, a few pages later, another murder. Nothing much happens for 30 pages or so until the detective, Dr. Hailey, pulls a new plot thread out of his hat for no reason at all and goes to explore it, thus proving his omniscience once and for all. By the end, I wasn’t even interested in the plot. I was just frustrated and trying to get through a tiresome work.

“Tiresome” describes the writing well. Wynne’s writing style is a real chore to struggle through, and I’m just happy to be alive right now. At best, his characters behave like second-rate actors performing a second-rate Victorian melodrama, and they have a tendency to monologue about nothing in particular. For instance, after Dr. Hailey brings up a new plot thread out of nowhere, we are treated to this lovely monologue from the wife of a dead man:

"He died for us!" she exclaimed in a voice in which ecstasy and revenge were mingled. "He laid down his life for us. Oh, sir, he was a good man and a fine one. Listen, the night before he died he talked a long while with our boy. John told him to go straight and tell the truth and love his mother. There were tears in his eyes, believe me, sir. Oh, sir, I didn't know then that the medicine was beginning to take effect on him. 'You're tired, John,' I said. But he wouldn't have it. He got up, after the boy went to bed, and walked about the room. Like he used to walk on his bridge. 'It's been a hard fight," he said, 'but I've won. And I want you to know that, my girl. I'm a happy man this night and I haven't known happiness for years.'”

That monologue treats us to much of the flaws in this book: melodramatic monologues no living human would ever spout, tiresome clich├ęs at every corner, and (worst of all) a complete lack of any sense of humour whatsoever. More than that: there’s no individuality or personality in this work. It feels like a robot wrote this, or perhaps it was all recycled from other works. Either way, the writing is coldly impersonal and unpleasant—you don’t get any sense of the author’s personality at all. Reading more than one Wynne per month is most likely hazardous to your health.

Incidentally, there is more than one impossible crime involved—there are two. The second is pretty quickly explained, though, and very obvious from the start. A policeman is randomly murdered out of nowhere in front of Dr. Hailey’s eyes. He went outside to see if it was snowing and had the back of his skull crushed in by a heavy instrument— the blow was so heavy that it glanced off his skull and smashed into the wall, destroying the brickwork. But there were no footprints whatsoever in the snow.  The melodrama is milked to the extreme:

He came to the room. At the sight of the body on the floor he drew back with a cry of dismay.
“Poor old George.”
He bent down and looked at the shattered head. When he rose again the blood was pale in his face.
“If I have to spend the rest of my life doing it, sir,” he exclaimed, “I’ll find the swine who has done this. One of the best lads in the force.” He added: “This time, anyhow, the snow will tell us something.”

Whoah, someone recovered from his shock quickly! You might as well have replaced that last sentence with “What’s for dinner?” It’s not just melodramatic, it’s inconsistent as well! Oh, and by the way, you never found out what the dead police officer’s name was until he was killed. Gotta love that character development. The explanation for the impossible crime, as I said, is obvious, but it also doesn’t seem to make sense. I can’t go into details here, but even though physics and I are notorious enemies, my knowledge of it is enough to make me seriously question the mechanics of the murder. Wynne’s explanation was unclear about a point or else his killer just got extremely lucky. Possibly both.

Which brings me full circle to the first murder— of all the cheek! This killer is the luckiest son-of-a-gun since the culprit in Seeing is Believing! The solution is technically fair, and yet I don’t whatsoever recall the key piece of evidence that clinches the method. In fact, a far simpler variation is proposed just pages before, and is rejected by the detective. Why? I’ll reconstruct the reason with some dialogue:

Inspector: "Blimey, if Bob didn't have the third onion at the time... it can only mean the butler was the killer!"
Detective: "Impossible! Absurd! The butler could never be the killer!"
Inspector: "Why not?"
Detective: "Because I said so."
Inspector: "Good point. I never thought about it that way."

Oh, come on! How lazy can you get? Give us an actual reason! I’m sick of detectives who can pick and choose their deductions at will—if you’re going to reject an alternative hypothesis, give us a reason! (This, by the way, is a major strength of R. Austin Freeman’s The Eye of Osiris— Dr. Thorndyke never just says “Because I said so”, he explains all his deductions thoroughly. Though sometimes they might get long-winded, it’s overall far more satisfying an approach that this one.)

To sum up, The Toll House Murder is a chore to get through. The author has no discernible sense of humour or personality, and the writing style is just atrocious. The impossible crimes have their points of interest, but are overall major disappointments, making this book a certain entry in the Hall of Shame of books I’ve read this year. By the end, it got overbearingly tiresome. Why didn’t Wynne achieve the popularity of Carr? This book is a textbook illustration. It really says a lot about an author’s writing style when I can honestly say it left me pining for some Freeman Wills Crofts. Crofts’ writing, at the very least, was entertaining.


Patrick Ohl ©2014