Thursday, July 19, 2018

Unlawful Acts: Suspect’s Viewpoint: Tom Leins

Unlawful Acts: Suspect’s Viewpoint: Tom Leins

Lit Hub: DO GREAT WRITERS REALLY STEAL? ON PLAGIARISM AND PUBLISHING

Lit Hub: DO GREAT WRITERS REALLY STEAL?  ON PLAGIARISM AND PUBLISHING

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Understanding Israel, Force of Nature, ...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Understanding Israel, Force of Nature, ...: Reported by Ambrea This week, Nevermore started off with  How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less  by Sarah Glidden.  In this gr...

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 7/18/19

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 7/18/19

Do Some Damage: Crime Shows to Fall Asleep By

Do Some Damage: Crime Shows to Fall Asleep By: Seems that in a period where there's so much free-floating anxiety, sleep becomes even more precious than usual.  It's the one time ...

CLASH: Ten Types of Writers We Need to Throw Down a Well by Gabino Iglesias

CLASH: Ten Types of Writers We Need to Throw Down a Well by Gabino Iglesias

Bitter Tea and Mystery: The Private Practice of Michael Shayne: Brett Hall...

Bitter Tea and Mystery: The Private Practice of Michael Shayne: Brett Hall...: This second book in the Michael Shayne series features a private investigator in Miami, Florida. His best friend, Larry Kincaid, gets involv...

Crimespree Magazine: INTERVIEW WITH LINDA CASTILLO

Crimespree Magazine: INTERVIEW WITH LINDA CASTILLO

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Grandkids

Grand kids and their parents came down for a visit and spent almost all of the afternoon here with us. A very few pictures....

Justin

Justin



Jacob



Only days left to win books by Laurien Berenson, Cynthia Riggs, Carole Beers, Cara Black from KRL

Only days left to win a copy of "Ruff Justice" by Laurien Berenson
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/ruff-justice-by-laurien-berenson/

And to win a copy of "Widow's Wreath" by Cynthia Riggs and while there
check out an interesting guest post by Cynthia about her senior main
character http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/widows-wreath-by-cynthia-riggs/

Also to win a copy of "Ghost Ranch" by Carole Beers and while there check
out an interesting interview with Carole
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/ghost-ranch-by-carole-t-beers/

And to win a copy of "Death by Expresso" by Alex Erickson
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/death-by-espresso-by-alex-erickson/

And to win a copy of "Confessions of a Red Herring" by Dana Dratch
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/confessions-of-a-red-herring-by-dana-dratch/

And on KRL News & Reviews to win a copy of "Murder on the Left Bank" by Cara
Black http://www.krlnews.com/2018/07/murder-on-left-bank-cara-black.html

Happy reading,
Lorie

MysteryPeople: INTERVIEW WITH ACE ATKINS

MysteryPeople: INTERVIEW WITH ACE ATKINS

Unlawful Acts Review: The Power of the Dog by Don Winslow

Unlawful Acts Review: The Power of the Dog by Don Winslow

MAKE MINE MYSTERY: The Research Monster, or Down the Rabbit Hole Part...

MAKE MINE MYSTERY: The Research Monster, or Down the Rabbit Hole Part...: by Janis Patterson My name is Janis Susan and I am a research geek. Last week on the Ladies of Mystery blog I wrote about the nec...

Guest Post: Jeanne and Treadmill Books: A Ghostly Mortality by Tonya Kappes


Treadmill Books:  A Ghostly Mortality by Tonya Kappes


I came late to this series, since this was the only title at the local Books A Million. 

Emma Lee Raines’ family has run a mortuary for years in a small town in Kentucky.  Emma is known for having “Funeral  Trauma,” which is to say that she takes these odd turns when she doesn’t make sense or talks to herself or even seems faint.  The truth is that Emma Lee is a “Betweener,” someone who can see and talk to the dead to help them get to the Afterlife.  In Emma Lee’s case, the dead she sees have been murdered and it’s up to her to solve the crime so they can rest in (presumable) peace.

The case in A Ghostly Mortality hits especially close to home when the dead person she sees is her sister Charlotte Rae.  Charlotte and Emma had a strained relationship at best, since Charlotte was ambitious, organized, stylish—well, everything Emma was not—and even left the family business for a larger funeral home business in another town. Charlotte is nonplussed to find that not only is she dead but her younger sister is the only one with whom she can communicate.  The sisters have a lot to work through—and of course there is the matter of a murderer on the loose.  Good thing Emma Lee’s boyfriend is  hunky police officer  Jack Henry who can help her investigate. Jack Henry is one of the few who knows about Emma’s gift; everyone else just thinks she’s tetched in the head, as the old expression goes.

If this book is any indication, the Southern Ghost Mysteries are chock full of quirky characters, quaint expressions, and embarrassing situations.  For me, I think it was the wrong book at the wrong time; I was in the mood for a mystery and the book is more about the humor.  I had reservations about the solution to the mystery, but thinking back on it the book could be said to be rather zen. . . it’s all about the funny journey to the solution rather than the solution itself. 

The cleverest thing for me was the weaving in of the next episode along with the current story as Emma keeps seeing a ghost cat wandering about the funeral home and the final scene setting up the next book really piqued my interest. 

I’ll reserve final judgment until I read at least one more, but while I think Southern humor aficionados will be happy, mystery readers will be less than satisfied.

The titles in order are A Ghostly Undertaking,  A Ghostly Grave, A Ghostly Demise, A Ghostly Murder, A Ghostly Reunion, A Ghostly Mortality, and A Ghostly Secret.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: A Princess in Theory by Alyssa Cole

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: A Princess in Theory by Alyssa Cole: Reviewed by Ambrea Naledi Smith is balancing two jobs, graduate school, and an epidemiology practicum that could completely cha...

MysteryPeople: INTERVIEW WITH MEGAN ABBOTT

MysteryPeople: INTERVIEW WITH MEGAN ABBOTT

Bitter Tea and Mystery: Murder is Academic: Christine Poulson

Bitter Tea and Mystery: Murder is Academic: Christine Poulson: After reading Christine Poulson's most recent mysteries (Deep Water and Cold, Cold Heart ) I wanted to go back and read her first series...

The Southwest Armchair Traveler: The Murder That Inspired a Romantic #Mystery Novel...

The Southwest Armchair Traveler: The Murder That Inspired a Romantic #Mystery Novel...: Many writers are inspired by real events or people in their lives. This makes difficult situations a form of research. “This stinks, but ...

LitReactor: 10 Reasons Book Reviews Still Matter

LitReactor: 10 Reasons Book Reviews Still Matter 

The Verge: BAD ROMANCE

The Verge: BAD ROMANCE 

Crime Watch: Review: DEATH ON D'URVILLE

Crime Watch: Review: DEATH ON D'URVILLE: DEATH ON D'URVILLE by Penelope Haines (Ithaca Publications, 2016) Reviewed by Karen Chisholm Death on D’Urville is the first novel...

Monday, July 16, 2018

Lesa's Book Critiques: Interview with Tonya Kappes

Lesa's Book Critiques: Interview with Tonya Kappes

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: MARGARITAS, MAYHEM, AND MURDER!

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: MARGARITAS, MAYHEM, AND MURDER!: This post is part of a virtual book tour organized by Goddess Fish Promotions . Mary will be awarding a $20 Amazon or B/N GC to a random...

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 7/16/18

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 7/16/18

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 50

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 50

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 7/16/18

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 7/16/18

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: TEXAS BOOKISH EVENTS July 16-22, 2...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: TEXAS BOOKISH EVENTS July 16-22, 2...: Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of July 16-22, 2018:  Special Events: 33rd Texas Shakespeare Festival , Kilgore, June 28-July 29...

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: Death’s Door by James Benn


Death’s Door by James Benn (Soho Crime, 2012) is the seventh title in a compulsively readable historical series set during World War II. Billy Boyle is a member of a tight-knit Boston Irish family who, having lost a brother during World War I, decided to pull some strings when Billy’s draft number comes up for the next war. One of his mother’s cousins is married to an Army general and the family finagles an appointment for Billy to his staff, congratulating themselves that he will sit the war out in safety in Washington, DC. When the cousin, General Dwight Eisenhower, is appointed Commander of the European Forces and moves to London, Billy finds himself on the front lines of the war in the kind of danger his family hoped to avoid.

His previous experience as a detective on the Boston Police Force stands him in good stead in the military and he becomes General Eisenhower’s unofficial investigator and troubleshooter, traveling all over Europe. In this story an American monsignor serving the Vatican has been stabbed and Billy is assigned the task of finding out why and by whom. The local police found a Jewish refugee near the body and turned him over to the Nazis, closing the case. The monsignor had influential friends in the United States who are not convinced the answer was that simple.

First Billy and his sidekick Lieutenant Piotr “Kaz” Kazimierz have to be smuggled into the Holy City, crossing German-held territory, and then they have to negotiate their way among the dizzying number of political and national factions within the Vatican to identify the killer, then they have to find their way back out. Complicating the task is the knowledge that Billy’s war-time girlfriend has been captured by the Germans and he’s been ordered not to try to find her for fear of disrupting undercover operations.

This book is as much of a historical snapshot of the last months of the war before the Vatican was liberated by the Allies as it is a mystery. It describes the complex and tenuous status of the Pope and everyone in the Vatican in authoritative detail. While in theory the Vatican City was neutral, it was also completely surrounded by the German army who could easily overrun the Papal State, so it was essential for the continuation of the Vatican for them to placate the Nazis. In the meantime many members of the Catholic Church hid Jews and refugees at great personal risk to themselves and to the Church. The Pope and his most senior officials walked a dangerous tightrope every day, appearing to follow the rules set down by the Germans while helping the thousands of refugees who made their way into the Holy City. The book also highlights clearly the lack of solidarity among the German allies, who joined Hitler for many reasons, not necessarily because they admired him.

This is a fine historical series, easily balancing academic detail and mystery plot without sacrificing sound characterization and engaging writing.




·         Hardcover: 358 pages
·         Publisher: Soho Crime; 1st Edition edition (September 4, 2012)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 1616951850
·         ISBN-13: 978-1616951856




Aubrey Hamilton © 2018
Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal IT projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Dru's Book Musings: Get To Know ~ Kate Burkholder by Linda Castillo

Dru's Book Musings: Get To Know ~ Kate Burkholder by Linda Castillo

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott: Reviewed by Jeanne We’ve all seen the little inspirational biographies of young athletes in the media: how the child develope...

For Dallas Area Folks: Stone Soup Peer Critique Groups

I just found out that one of the groups meets over here at Lucky Dog Books on Garland Road. I am nowhere near emotionally steady enough these days to face a critique group nor do I have anything remotely ready. But, in case you are in the Dallas area and also did not know about this, I share the link for Stone Soup Peer Critique Groups http://www.writersgarret.org/project/stone-soup/

Criminal Minds: To Tweet, or Not to Tweet by Paul D. Marks

Criminal Minds: To Tweet, or Not to Tweet: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Blogs, Newsletters…what social media do you use and how do you use it? What don’t you use, and why not? Any ad...

KRL This Week Update for 7/14/18

Up in KRL this morning a review and giveaway of "Ruff Justice" by Laurien
Berenson http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/ruff-justice-by-laurien-berenson/



And a review and giveaway of "Widow's Wreath" by Cynthia Riggs along with
an interesting guest post by Cynthia about her senior main character
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/widows-wreath-by-cynthia-riggs/



Also a review and giveaway of "Ghost Ranch" by Carole Beers along with an
interesting interview with Carole
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/ghost-ranch-by-carole-t-beers/



And a review and giveaway of "Death by Expresso" by Alex Erickson
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/death-by-espresso-by-alex-erickson/



We also have a review & giveaway of "Confessions of a Red Herring" by Dana
Dratch
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/confessions-of-a-red-herring-by-dana-dratch/



And a review of the mystery TV show The Brokenwood Mysteries
http://kingsriverlife.com/07/14/the-brokenwood-mysteries-streaming-on-acorn-tv/



On KRL News & Reviews we have a review & giveaway of "Murder on the Left
Bank" by Cara Black
http://www.krlnews.com/2018/07/murder-on-left-bank-cara-black.html



And a review and giveaway of "Once Upon a Fact" edited by Katherine
Tomlinson. This one is more fantasy and scifi-but a lot of familiar mystery
names in it like Kaye George and local authors like Bonnie Hearn Hill
http://www.krlnews.com/2018/07/once-upon-fact-futuristic-fairy-tales.html

Happy reading,
Lorie

Beat To A Pulp: GENNY BOW by Chris La Tray

Beat To A Pulp: GENNY BOW by Chris La Tray

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 7/13/18

The Rap Sheet:  Revue of Reviewers for 7/13/18

Saturdays With Kaye: Kill Devil Falls by Brian Klingborg

Kill Devil Falls by Brian Klingborg



After an ominous beginning, the action escalates with plenty of brutality to go around. Each denizen of Kill Devil Falls is more bizarre than the last.

U.S. Marshal Helen Morrissey gets an unwanted, but not particularly difficult-sounding assignment—to drive to Kill Devil Falls and pick up a felon who is being held there. The sheriff who was supposed to take her, Rita Crawford, back to Sacramento, has been called away on another emergency. Helen doesn’t realize that she has made herself a target just by driving north to that desolate mountain spot, now almost a ghost town.

And no wonder! The town has been declared an environmental disaster area, sink holes and a tainted water supply, prompting the government to attempt to move everyone out. The people who remain have their own dark reasons for being there, some of them deeply hidden. Nothing is quite what it seems when she gets there and she is given the run-around by nearly everyone. Not knowing who to trust, she wonders if she’ll make it out alive.

A rocky ride! I loved it!



Reviewed by Kaye George, author of, Death on the Trek, for Suspense Magazine. Death on the Trek is currently on sale for $2.50 at Smashwords.


Friday, July 13, 2018

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 7/11/18

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 7/11/18

Writer Beware: VANITY PUBLISHER ALERT: NOVUM PUBLISHING, UNITED P.C. PUBLISHER

Writer Beware: VANITY PUBLISHER ALERT: NOVUM PUBLISHING, UNITED P.C. PUBLISHER

FFB Review: POLITICALLY CORRECT BEDTIME STORIES by James Finn Garner (Reviewed by Barry Ergang)

The review below by Barry first ran on September 21, 2012. Considering the state of things these days, it seemed a good time to run it again as part of FFB. For the full list of reading suggestions, head over to Patti’s fabulous blog.


POLITICALLY CORRECT BEDTIME STORIES (1994)
by James Finn Garner

Reviewed by Barry Ergang

Paperback

“Political correctness” is one of those cultural concepts that some abhor, some wholeheartedly embrace, and some treat selectively. It’s had a profound effect on our language, but not always for its betterment. It’s caused us to rethink certain attitudes and approaches to people and situations and alter our behaviors accordingly. With both positive and negative attributes, it’s ripe for satirizing, and that’s exactly what James Finn Garner has done to it in Politically Correct Bedtime Stories. As he points out in an introduction, “When they were first written, the stories on which the following tales are based certainly served their purpose—to entrench the patriarchy, to estrange people from their own natural impulses, to demonize ‘evil’ and to ‘reward’ an ‘objective’ ‘good.’...Today, we have the opportunity—and the obligation—to rethink these ‘classic’ stories so they reflect more enlightened times.” We used to call these stories “fairy tales,” but that term, Garner says, reflects a “heterosexualist bias” and must thus be done away with.

This slim, undersized volume (it runs seventy-nine pages and measures seven-and-a-quarter by five-and-an-eighth inches) contains thirteen very short renderings of familiar stories. Without giving away too much lest I spoil the surprises, I’ll try to convey a sense of what the author has done. For instance, in “Little Red Riding Hood,” we’re told of the titular character that “One day her mother asked her to take a basket of fresh fruit and mineral water to her grandmother’s house—not because this was womyn’s work, mind you, but because the deed was generous and helped engender a feeling of community.”

The tailor in “The Emperor’s New Clothes” tells the vain monarch, “...I have brought with me a special fabric that is so rare and fine that it can be seen only by certain people—the type of people you’d want to have in your realm—people who are politically correct, morally righteous, intellectually astute, culturally tolerant, and who don’t smoke, drink, laugh at sexist jokes, watch too much television, listen to country music, or barbecue.”
 
Audio
The “economically disadvantaged” miller in “Rumpelstiltskin” “was very ashamed of his poverty, rather than angry at the economic system that had marginalized him, and was always searching for a way to get rich quick.”

In the longest story in the book “Snow White,” fleeing from the wicked queen, runs into the woods and comes upon a cottage inhabited by “seven bearded vertically challenged men” who refer to themselves as “the Seven Towering Giants.” When the queen learns where the girl is, she disguises herself as “a chronologically gifted woman,” goes to the cottage, and begs Snow White to buy an apple. “Snow White thought for a moment. In protest against agribusiness conglomerates, she had a personal rule against buying food from middlepersons. But her heart went out to the economically marginalized woman, so she said yes.”

The other stories, which in “updating” Garner turns on their heads so their endings are not usually what readers have come to expect, are “The Three Little Pigs,” “The Three Codependent Goats Gruff,” “Rapunzel,” “Cinderella,” “Goldilocks,” “Chicken Little,” “The Frog Prince,” “Jack and the Beanstalk,” and “The Pied Piper of Hamelin.”

Readers whose taste runs to satire will most likely enjoy Politically Correct Bedtime Stories. They may not want to read it at bedtime, however, lest their laughter give them a second wind and consequent insomnia. The book is available in both physical and e-book (Kindle, Nook, Smashwords) editions. There is a sequel, Once Upon a More Enlightened Time, as well as Politically Correct Holiday Stories: For an Enlightened Yuletide Season. I also just discovered that the author has put out what appears to be (so far, at least) a Kindle edition only, Tea Party Fairy Tales.

I may eventually have to look at all of them. In any case, this one is recommended. 



Barry Ergang © 2012, 2018

Some of Derringer Award-winner Barry Ergang’s work is available at Amazon and Smashwords. The latter site is running its annual sale through the month of July. Barry and Kevin Tipple are among the participating authors, so take advantage of their reduced prices.