Sunday, May 28, 2017

In Honor of Barry Ergang

I found this a few weeks ago and thought of my man Barry as he says "meh" a lot by email and on the phone. I meant to share this at that time. Things happened and I did not get it done. Found it again tonight and it made me laugh again.



Texas Writers Month: A (Partial) Atlas of Texas Crime Fiction (Mystery People)

Texas Writers Month: A (Partial) Atlas of Texas Crime Fiction (Mystery People)

At the Scene of the Crime: Treasure Island

At the Scene of the Crime: Treasure Island: Introduction: Goodness me, it has been a very long time since I last reviewed a book, not since late August of 2015!! Unfortunately, the ...

Mystery Fanfare: Barbecue Mysteries

Mystery Fanfare: Barbecue Mysteries: Hope you're having a wonderful Memorial Day Weekend.  Did you know that 53% of Americans will be barbecuing this weekend ? Will you?...

MysteryPeople Q&A with Ace Atkins

MysteryPeople Q&A with Ace Atkins

Relevant History: Psilocybin in the Bronze Age by Rebecca Lochlann

Relevant History: Psilocybin in the Bronze Age by Rebecca Lochlann

The Short Mystery Fiction Society Blog: Short Story Month: Kevin R. Tipple

The Short Mystery Fiction Society Blog: Short Story Month: Kevin R. Tipple: StoryADay.org proclaimed May International Short Story Month back in 2013. As the short story, in the mystery genre is the reason why the ...

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 5/27/17

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 5/27/17

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: LORRAINE, BRIDE BRIGADE BOOK 6, RELEASED!

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: LORRAINE, BRIDE BRIGADE BOOK 6, RELEASED!: Thanks to the many of you who have requested the next book in the Bride Brigade series. I’m happy to announce the release of LORRAIN E, B...

Mystery Fanfare: Memorial Day Mysteries / Memorial Day Crime Fiction

Mystery Fanfare: Memorial Day Mysteries / Memorial Day Crime Fictio...: Memorial Day aka Decoration Day is a day of remembrance of those men and women who who fell protecting us, of those who didn't co...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Juniper: The Girl Who Was Born Too Soon by Kelley and Thomas French

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Juniper: The Girl Who Was Born Too Soon by Kelley ...: Reviewed by Kristin How do you decide whether or not to take extraordinary measures to save a baby born at twenty-three weeks and s...

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 61 Fabulous Writing Conferences in June 2017!

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 61 Fabulous Writing Conferences in June 2017!: June is a great month for writing conferences. It's vacation time for anyone attending school, and with the warm weather and free time...

KRL This Week Update for 5/27/17

Up in KRL this morning reviews & giveaways of 4 May mysteries for your summer reading-"A Nightshade for Warning": An Enchanted Garden Mystery by Bailey Cattrell, "Every Body on Deck": A Savannah Reid Mystery by G.A. McKevett, "Magick & Mayhem": An Abracadabra Mystery by Sharon Pape, and "Death in Dark Blue": A Writer’s Apprentice Mystery by Julia Buckley http://kingsriverlife.com/05/27/may-mysteries-for-your-summer-reading/

Also up this week a review & giveaway of a fun new pet mystery by Linda O. Johnston, "Bad to the Bone", along with a pet related guest post by Linda http://kingsriverlife.com/05/27/bad-to-the-bone-by-linda-o-johnston/

And a review & giveaway of "Hospitality and Homicide" by Lynn Cahoon, along with an interesting interview with Lynn http://kingsriverlife.com/05/27/hospitality-and-homicide-by-lynn-cahoon/

Also the latest mystery Coming Attractions by Sunny Frazier, along with a giveaway of a signed hard copy of "Mulch Ado About Murder" by Edith Maxwell http://kingsriverlife.com/05/27/coming-attractions-june-is-bustin-out-all-over/

We also have an article about the mysteries of Faye Kellerman http://kingsriverlife.com/05/27/faye-kellermans-orthodox-detectives-peter-and-rina-decker/


May 29 is KRL's 7th Anniversary! To celebrate we are introducing a new blog (which is a work in progress), and a contest to give the blog its official name. Details of the contest can be found in the post--you have a chance at winning a $10 Amazon gift card, so be sure to check it out http://krlreviews.blogspot.com/2017/05/name-that-blog-krl-anniversary-contest.html

For those who also enjoy fantasy, over on KRL Lite a review & giveaway of "Bound" by Benedict Jacka http://kingsriverlife.blogspot.com/2017/05/bound-by-benedict-jacka.html
Happy reading, Lorie


KRL is now selling advertising & we have special discounts for
mystery authors & bookstores! Ask me about it!
Mystery section in Kings River Life http://KingsRiverLife.com
Check out my own blog at http://mysteryratscloset.blogspot.com/

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Western Short Story: A Bad Draw of the Cards by J. R. Lindermuth (Rope and Wire)

Western Short Story: A Bad Draw of the Cards by J. R. Lindermuth (Rope and Wire)

In Reference To Murder Blog: Mystery Melange for 5/24/17

In Reference To Murder Blog: Mystery Melange for 5/24/17

Crime Review Update: New Issue

We feature 20 new reviews in each issue of Crime Review (
www.crimereview.co.uk), together with a top industry interview. This time
it’s author James Oswald in the Countdown hot seat:
http://crimereview.co.uk/page.php/interview/4845

We’re on Twitter at:
Crime Review: @CrimeReviewUK
Linda Wilson: @CrimeReviewer
Sharon Wheeler: @lartonmedia

This week’s reviews are:

PRUSSIAN BLUE by Philip Kerr, reviewed by Chris Roberts
Bernie Gunther takes flight from a Stasi apparatchik in 1956, putting him
in mind of his 1939 investigation into a murder at the Berchtesgaden.

MASK OF SHADOWS by Oscar de Muriel, reviewed by John Cleal
London’s top luvvies bring the Scottish Play – and its curse – north of the
border and create a scene of chaos and corpses for paranormal investigators
Inspectors Frey and ‘Nine Nails’ McGray.

MAIGRET AND THE TALL WOMAN by Georges Simenon, reviewed by Arnold Taylor
Maigret receives a surprise visit from a former prostitute he had arrested
many years before. She tells a strange story and asks for his help.

FROST AT MIDNIGHT by James Henry, reviewed by Linda Wilson
DI Jack Frost has a wedding and a murder to contend with in Denton during
the hot summer of 1983. And then a woman goes missing.

THE CITY IN DARKNESS by Michael Russell, reviewed by Chris Roberts
In 1939, neutrality distances Ireland from the struggle in Europe, but the
Irish Special Branch have plenty of concerns about what is happening at
home.

WRITTEN IN BONES by James Oswald, reviewed by Linda Wilson
DI Tony Maclean is given the unenviable job of discovering why a former
bent copper has ended up impaled on top of a tree in an Edinburgh park.

ROGUES’ HOLIDAY by Margery Allingham writing as Maxwell March, reviewed by
John Cleal
Inspector David Blest, unhappy when his superiors curtail his investigation
into the apparent suicide of a young man-about-town, takes a break at a
posh seaside hotel, where the distinguished lawyer, whose account of events
leaves him dissatisfied, is also staying

UNDER THE HARROW by Flynn Berry, reviewed by Kati Barr-Taylor
Nora is expecting a home-cooked dinner with her sister. That will never
happen again. 
 
 
MISTRESS OF THE JUST LAND by David Ashton, reviewed by John Cleal
Jean Brash, a child of the streets, now madam of Edinburgh’s finest
brothel, sets out to discover who killed an unpopular judge and left his
body in her cellar.

DOG FIGHT by Michael J Malone, reviewed by Linda Wilson
An underground fight ring is sucking in former soldiers living on the
streets with promises of big money. But the risks are high and there’s no
easy way out.

DEATH GOING DOWN by María Angélica Bosco, reviewed by Chris Roberts
A beautiful young woman is found dead in the lift of a luxury Buenos Aires
apartment block. Inspector Ericort and his assistant Blasi try to find out
why.

ARROWOOD by Mick Finlay, reviewed by John Cleal
A missing-person case for down-at-heel private eye William Arrowood and his
friend Norman Barnett spirals into an investigation of sexual exploitation,
perversion, murder and terrorism.

CHAMELEON PEOPLE by Hans Olav Lahlum, reviewed by Ewa Sherman
Inspector Kolbjørn Kristiansen’s quiet evening is shattered when a young
cyclist turns up at his apartment. He has run away from a crime scene but
proclaims his innocence, even though he’s in possession of a bloodied knife
used to kill a prominent politician.

BLACKOUT by Marc Elsberg, reviewed by Jim Beaman
Someone is wiping out electrical power all over Europe. Can Piero Manzano
stop the blackout before it’s too late?

BLACK NIGHT FALLING by Rod Reynolds, reviewed by John Cleal
Reporter Charlie Yates answers a plea from a former colleague and is
plunged into a stew of small town corruption and murder.

SIREN by Annemarie Neary, reviewed by Kati Barr-Taylor
Roisin Burns has spent the last 25 years hiding out in New York, living,
breathing and creating memories of herself as Sheen. But it is all a lie.

THE WATERS OF ETERNAL YOUTH BY Donna Leon, reviewed by Sylvia Maughan
Commissario Brunetti is asked to investigate the case of a young girl who
nearly drowned 15 years ago. Brain damage has left her trapped in the
mindset of the young girl. He must find out how she came to be in the
water, and whether she fell or was pushed.

THE BLACK PANTHER by Gordon Lowe, reviewed by Kati Barr-Taylor
January 1975. A girl is missing. But this is no teenage prank, as her
mother and the whole of Britain is about to find out.

THE MISSING HOURS by Emma Kavanagh, reviewed by John Barnbrook
Selena Cole disappears leaving her two young daughters alone in a
playground. Meanwhile, on an isolated mountain road, the body of a young
man is found. Against a background of commercial kidnap and rescue work,
the police investigation leads to some surprising connections.

THE CRUELTY by Scott Bergstrom, reviewed by Linda Wilson
When Gwen Bloom’s diplomat father goes missing, she’s forced to take
matters into her own hands if she ever wants to see him again.

Best wishes

Sharon 

Friday, May 26, 2017

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: My Brother Michael by Mary Stewart

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: My Brother Michael by Mary Stewart: Reviewed by Jeanne Camilla Haven, a young Englishwoman, is taking a long anticipated vacation in Greece when a man approache...

Cardiologists Visit

Both Sandi and I had visits with our respective cardiologists today. They went fine. We passed both of our EKG tests with flying colors. I was amazed as I had not done any studying at all.

Her guy thinks she is stable and there should be no issues from a cardiac standpoint with her chemo. Obviously, something bad could happen with her heart and the chemo, but he does not expect that at all. He was absolutely thrilled to see her and made her promise to see him next year at this time.

My guy is a bit worried about me and the "extreme stress" I have been under since January. Is it extreme? I have no way of actually knowing. It is our lives. It does not feel different than normal. He says that is a concern, but not something he is going to try and address now.

I am to monitor my blood pressure and other symptoms I have and if I have additional issues or my ongoing situation seems to be worsening, I am to immediately get in touch with with him and we will go from there. Standard advice though he really pushed it today.

So, all in all, things went fine for today on that front.


FFB Today Elsewhere

For obvious reasons, I do not have an FFB post today. Todd Mason has the links over at his Sweet Freedom blog.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Very Bad News

After a brief detour to see my brother who is currently here, as well as pick up Sandi's latest medications, we are now home. We got very bad news today.

Long story short--- the large B cell thing is pretty much everywhere in all sizes and shapes tumor wise and that includes multiple lymph nodes in her neck, chest and groin area. Doctors are trying to be positive and scrape me off the floor, but the situation is really bad. 

Only because it is a holiday weekend and all that entails with hospital staff and support, they are holding off admitting her for a new five day round of chemo until next Tuesday. Much of what they have used before chemo wise is ruled out now due to the fact that she has either built up a tolerance to it or if they used it again it would kill her.

If the first chemo deal does not work, they have a second option that has huge toxicity and other risks with it. They really don't want to try that as there are major issues with it.

So, not only is the news bad, it is far worse than anyone expected. They kept stressing they were not giving up and did not want her to give up either. She isn't. She took it amazingly well.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Pet Scan Done

One never wants to hear that that the "drug product failed sterility test." That is what we were told about 10:20 this morning as we waited for the procedure to get going. We were already twenty minutes behind so we knew something was up as nobody had any sense of urgency at check in or anywhere along the line. That was because the check in folks already knew things were running two hours behind.

Once they finally got started, Sandi's blood sugar number was all the way down to 56 so that had to be treated and brought back up high enough to start the test. That took an hour.

Finally, they got underway sometime after 1--more than three hours late--and got it done. At least it is finally over. Theoretically, they will have the results tomorrow morning when we see the cancer doctor.

Guest Post: Jeanne and Treadmill Books: Mainely Needlepoint Mystery Series by Lea Wait

Last Wednesday Jeanne of the Bookblog of the Bristol Library started something new with her Treadmill Books Review. These are books that she reads while on the treadmill. Such books have to fit her criteria of “…. A  book has to be entertaining without being too demanding. If I’d rather walk than read, that is not a good book. On the other hand, if the book is so enjoyable that I end up walking extra steps just so I can read another chapter, then that is a fine book indeed.” 


Treadmill Books:  Mainely Needlepoint Mystery Series by Lea Wait


Angie Curtis is an independent young woman who never knew who her father was, and whose mother disappeared when she was still a child.  She was reared and loved by her grandmother who gave her stability, but there’s still a bit of a void in her life. She left her grandmother and Maine far behind, taking on a variety of odd jobs, including acting as an assistant to a private investigator.  Finding herself at loose ends, she’s not sure what her next step should be—and then comes word that her mother has been found.

Or what’s left of her.

Angie had always believed that her mother simply abandoned her, so the revelation that her mother died all those years ago shakes her to her core.  She heads back to Maine to face her memories, and maybe to reconnect a bit before she moves on again.

Then she discovers that her mother was murdered.

Naturally, I picked up the large print version of the book based on the cat on the cover.  My theory is that if I don’t like the hero/heroine, maybe I’ll like the cat enough to finish. In this case, the cat is mostly false advertising. There is a cat in the early books, Juno, but she belongs to Angie’s grandmother and merits only brief mentions.  (Later on, Angie ends up with a cat of her own who is a bit more involved in the story.) 

Luckily, this was a book that held my interest even without a cat. The plot allows the reader to get to know Angie very well as she searches her childhood memories for anything that might be, in hindsight, an important clue. This is a good time to note that Wait is very good with characterization.  She creates memorable characters instead of stereotypical ones and uses the coastal Maine setting to quite well.  I like her use of sensory descriptions, from the gritty feel of the sand to the smell of frying seafood, making Haven Harbor feel tangible. Because Angie has spent time in Arizona, there is ample opportunity for Wait to have Angie re-experience her hometown through all her senses: new and yet familiar.  It gives readers a good feel for the place.

There’s a fine blend of character, place, and plot.  Over the course of the series, Wait constantly introduces new characters while fleshing out old ones.  This makes the books somewhat sequential and yet I don’t think this is a series that has to be read in order as each book is self-contained. (Though I would recommend starting with Twisted Threads for Angie’s background; after that, it’s easier to jump around.)  I admire the way Wait handles the possibility that someone may read out of sequence: acknowledging an event obliquely but without so much detail that the older book is spoiled, giving a sense of continuity to those who have read the previous books but not spoiling it for newcomers.  It’s a delicate balance and Wait navigates it well.

This is a favorite treadmill series because the books keep me so involved that I don’t mind as much that I am on a trail to nowhere.  In fact, I have been known to walk for “just one more chapter,” which is quite the achievement. My Fitbit thanks you, Ms. Wait.  

At the moment, I’m all caught up with the series but Thread the Halls is due out in October 2017.  

The rest of the books are:

1.      Twisted Threads
2.      Threads of Evidence
3.      Thread and Gone
4.      Dangling by a Thread
5.      Tightening the Threads



Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Sandi Update

Assuming her diabetes cooperates --and that is very questionable as her numbers have been all over the map---Sandi is supposed to have her PET SCAN much of the morning tomorrow. They believe they will have the  results back in time for her appointment Thursday morning with the cancer folks.

At least if they do have the results we will know just how bad the situation truly is and what the plan is for treatment. The waiting is brutal.

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Jeff Cohen on “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Girl”

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Jeff Cohen on “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Girl”: Jeff Cohen on “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Girl” | Trace Evidence : Jeff Cohen is the author of the Aaron Tucker series, the Asperger’s Myster...

WELCOME TO HELL ~ by Glenn Walker: Justice League: Throne of Atlantis

WELCOME TO HELL ~ by Glenn Walker: Justice League: Throne of Atlantis: Justice League: Throne of Atlantis ~ Throne of Atlantis is the first sequel to Justice League: War , which in turn was a result of the ...

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Roger Moore , R. I. P.

Bill Crider's Pop Culture Magazine: Roger Moore , R. I. P.: The Guardian : He was the epitome of the suave English gent, quipping sweatlessly in a bespoke three-piece suit, who enjoyed an acting caree...

My Review At Plano Reads: A Dying Fall: A Ruth Galloway Mystery by Elly Griffiths

My Review At Plano Reads: A Dying Fall: A Ruth Galloway Mystery by Elly Griffiths

Monday, May 22, 2017

Do Some Damage: Word Power

Do Some Damage: Word Power: There's been a lot of talk in my Facebook feed over the past few weeks that's had a common underlying theme. It started with th...

In Reference to Murder: Media Murder for Monday 5/22/17

In Reference to Murder: Media Murder for Monday 5/22/17

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Cha...: Reviewed by Kristin Rosemary is glad to head out into deep space with the crew of the Wayfarer.   While the Wayfarer is not the...

Small Crimes: Seeing my book made into a movie

Small Crimes: Seeing my book made into a movie

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: FALLING FOR HIM WAS NOT PART OF HER PLAN!

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: FALLING FOR HIM WAS NOT PART OF HER PLAN!: The Heartbeat Hypothesis by Lindsey Frydman Genre: Contemporary Romance Audra Madison simply wanted to walk in the sh...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: TEXAS LITERARY CALENDAR 5/22-28

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: TEXAS LITERARY CALENDAR 5/22-28: Bookish events in Texas for the week of May 22-28, 2017:  Special Events: Boldface: A Conference for Emerging Writers , Houston, May 22-2...

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: Garden of Lamentations by Deborah Crombie

Garden of Lamentations by Deborah Crombie (William Morrow, 2017) is the 17th title in a fine British police procedural series that is notable for its consistency.  Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James are acclimating to their new assignments, new locales and new coworkers to size up and fit in with, when they are each pulled into separate investigations. The body of a nanny is found in the private garden of an upscale Notting Hill neighborhood one morning. Because Gemma knows some of the residents, the investigating officer pulls strings to have her assigned to support the inquiry. She learns a lot about the seemingly peaceful neighborhood: a child died in an accident earlier in the year, one of the boys is a promising student in the competitive world of ballet, and residents slip in and out of each other’s houses after dark.

In the meantime Duncan’s former supervisor has popped up again after being on leave for several months. Duncan has questions about his sudden transfer arranged by this supervisor but is mystified by the request to meet with him after hours at a pub well away from any of the usual police hangouts. He is still haunted by the death of a police colleague a couple of months earlier and feels the investigation was closed prematurely. Duncan begins quietly asking questions about this case and others that seem to be linked. When he learns the supervisor was savagely attacked on his way home from their meeting, he uses the attack to delve into a number of cases thought to be resolved and to answer simmering questions.

Crombie balanced the competing plots nicely. Either is sufficiently complex for a book on its own, I wondered why she decided to put both into one book. All of the threads were carefully pulled together though and tied off at the end. I particularly liked the realism in juggling family and work responsibilities. Gemma and Duncan have three children; at least once while out interviewing witnesses Gemma told her colleague that they had to stop soon or she would have to arrange for child care. She was angered by Duncan cancelling his plans with the children when he was consumed with his work, all quite realistic. (Authors who work children or pets into a story and then forget to take care of them lose me as a reader.)

My only complaint with this book, as with many other current releases: I am tired of stories told in different timeframes. Yes, that’s just about the only way to explain a cold case, which is a common theme these days. Yes, the usage in this book is not as annoying as some others I’ve read. However, I was intrigued when I first encountered the device, now I’m not. Just tell the story, please.

This is a long book, over 400 pages, but worth the reading time. Booklist starred review.
  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow (February 7, 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062271636 
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062271631 


Aubrey Hamilton © 2017

Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal IT projects by day and reads mysteries at night.