Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Relevant History: The Hidden History of Ireland’s Magdalene Asylums

Relevant History: The Hidden History of Ireland’s Magdalene Asylums

Mystery Fanfare: MWA Edgar Award Nominees

Mystery Fanfare: MWA Edgar Award Nominees: Mystery Writers of America announced the Nominees for the 2019 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-ficti...

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: THE FABERGE ENTANGLEMENT

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: THE FABERGE ENTANGLEMENT: Don't miss the Rafflecopter giveaway at the end of the post! The Faberge Entanglement by Lesley Meryn and Elle Brooks ...

Review: Switchblade: Stiletto Heeled Editor Lisa Douglass


Billed as The Women of Noir Special Issue, and edited by Lisa Douglas who also contributed a poem, Switchblade: Stiletto Heeled is packed with stories of no nonsense women doing what they need to do to survive. Often, survival involves lethality and doing very bad things unto others before bad things are done to them.

The short fiction begins with “Dishes, Dishes, Dishes” by Cindy Rosmus. The last thing she ever wanted to do was wash dishes. The dishwasher in the place is, of course, broken so her first night on the job starts off bad and then gets way worse.

“Ring. Buzz.” by Ann Aptaker follows with a grocery delivery that changed everything. That delivery and the arrival of chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream.

Kelsey isn’t about to easily give up the password in “Concrete Blond” by Susan Kuchinskas. Tommy is what he is so she knows he is doing all this because of her baby sister, Lisa. Game on as he can be played.

While the three preceding stories were in the “Quick & Dirty Flash” section, the next story is all by itself in the ‘Micro Flash” section. “A Shot at Being Ordinary” by Susan Cornford. A tale of less than fifty words, it defied being described. To do so, in any way, would ruin a power tale.

The works of nine authors make up the following “Sharp & Deadly Fiction” section that opens with a tale by Tawny Pike. Her story, “Death Dance in Jacksonino County” features a couple of sleaze ball cops of the lowest order, drugs, and a mom who is doing her best to keep her and her kids surviving. Good thing she always has her knife on the leather thong around her neck. Just part of her plan.

She should have been left alone at her elderly age. Left to live in pace as she was not real threat to anyone. If somebody was going to mess with her, that person should have picked a better tool.  In “Strong- armed and Dangerous” by Charlotte Platt, somebody sent the wrong guy to kill Ida Brown. She knew how to handle the young punk because she had a lifetime of experience. Now somebody in charge has become a problem and it is time to track the problem back to where it started.

Not everything the woman wears to entertain the kids is fake. In “Priscilla, the Amazing Dancing Pig” by Sarah Jilek, the paying gig was supposed to be the typical kids birthday party. Then the father of the birthday girl took things way too far as the man wanted a souvenir. Now she wants one, maybe more, as well.

Mom is not going to make the same mistakes with her youngest daughter. In “Influencers” by Sarah M. Chen, Mom is still mourning the loss of Lil Bei-Bei who was gunned down at the Hollywood Palladium on Sunset. The hip hop game is a tough one, but Mom is working on getting her seven year old daughter, Bhad Mei, ready now. She is going to be an even bigger, brighter star than her deceased older sister. 

Paige Kaneko knows exactly what her brother is and has frequently saved him from a crisis. In “Mayhem & Mahalo” by Bethany Maines he needs her help again. And this time it is bad enough she is going to have to put on a bra. She does not like doing that one damn bit. Blood, dead guys, and a living guy tied up in a bathtub is just some of what is going on thanks to Benjiro latest crisis.

She isn’t going to make it through the night if she can’t outwit the loan shark, Slater. She would not be playing cards for her life in the old hotel casino in Vegas if the other card game a few days earlier had gone right for her and her boyfriend, Carl. It didn’t and now she has a bad hand in more ways than one in “Crazy Eights” by Serena Jayne.

“A Sinner in the Hands of an Angry God” by Carmen Jaramillo follows with a tale where the past has come back to haunt her via a blackmail/extortion attempt. The woman a few folks knew as ‘Freya” isn’t the same person she was twenty-five years ago. Because of the man who goes by the name “Gespenst” and her own personal pain, she did things back then that must never see the light of day. Her new life would be destroyed and a lawyer sending a cease and desist letter is not going to solve her problem.

Ashton Talley is working hard, sexually speaking, and getting nowhere in "Mouthbreather” by E. F. Sweetman. He isn’t any better as a businessman or a boss and Kristi knows it. She just had no idea how little he thought of her until she stayed late one night and he and his buddies came back after a night of heavy drinking. She knows the insurance business and the company will go under if she does not take charge and fix the problem.

She goes by various names and she knows she should have gotten rid of the phone after the last job. She only kept it because Fred Mikes said he might have another job for her. Instead of working for him again, he went and told Cynthia Samson about her. Samson is willing to pay very well in order to have something of hers taken back from her soon to be ex-husband. A dangerous man that she is in hiding from and wants her help in “Hardball” by Lissa Marie Redmond. This story also brings the fiction to a close.

Published last November, the thirteen tales included in Switchblade: Stiletto Heeled are occasionally graphic in terms of dialogue and scene descriptions as one would expect from a crime fiction noir read. In every case women are doing what they need to do to survive in either a world they created or one that was thrust upon them. Consequences of failure are often lethal as are the consequences of freedom.

Switchblade: Stiletto Heeled is certainly not for everyone. If you prefer your violence off page, prefer women to drink tea and solve murders while possibly knitting or running small bookshops, this is not the read for you. If you like violence and alcohol and getting even, regardless of your gender, this is the read for you. Just remember that plans, no matter how good they are, often don’t work out. Or maybe they do as none of us really have any control over anything.



Switchblade: Stiletto Heeled
Editor Lisa Douglass
Caledonia Press
November 2018
ISBN# 0998765082
eBook (also available in paperback format)
174 Pages
$2.99





Material was purchased to read and review last November.


Kevin R. Tipple ©2019

Monday, January 21, 2019

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: My Brother's Husband by Gengoroh Tagame

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: My Brother's Husband by Gengoroh Tagame: Reviewed by Ambrea Yaichi is a divorced, single father who spends his days working from home and looking after his precocious daugh...

Guest Blogging is the Best FREE Publicity for Writers: 12 Tips for Landing Effective Guest Blog Spots

Guest Blogging is the Best FREE Publicity for Writers: 12 Tips for Landing Effective Guest Blog Spots

Lesa's Book Critiques: Below the Tree Line by Susan Oleksiw

Lesa's Book Critiques: Below the Tree Line by Susan Oleksiw

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 70

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 70

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 01/21/19

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 01/21/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 1/21/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 1/21/19

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar January 21...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar January 21...: Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of January 21-27, 2019:  Special Events: 14th Annual MLK Symposium , Dallas, January 21 Lampas...

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: The Defendants by John Ellsworth


The Defendants  by John Ellsworth (Subjudica House, 2014) is the first book in his Thaddeus Murfee legal thriller series, although a prequel released in 2018 makes it the second in the chronology of series events. Less than two years of legal practice in the small town of Orbit, somewhere in southern Illinois, has left Thaddeus ill-prepared to take on a defense for murder, but his client, poor but honest waitress Ermeline Ransom insists he’s the only lawyer she trusts.

Ermeline unfortunately got between the local public works contractor and the Chicago mob to whom the contractor had discontinued kickbacks. When a visit from a mob enforcer did not shake the overdue payments loose, the enforcer attacked Ermeline and set the stage for the contractor to be accused of the crime. After the Orbit Attorney General declined to prosecute for lack of evidence, Ermeline then retained Thaddeus to pursue civil damages.

This was not what the mob had in mind; they did not want any competition for the money they believed the contractor owed them. They decided to squash these upstarts from nowhere once and for all by killing the contractor and slickly framing Ermeline. The local police had no choice but to arrest her on the face of the evidence but Thaddeus knows she didn’t do it. How he outsmarts the cutthroat prosecuting attorney from Chicago while collecting the proof and testimony needed to bring the crime home to its perpetrators make a lively absorbing read.

The author says these books, about a dozen in the series, are based on his early days as a practicing lawyer, and I believe him. Thaddeus makes some rookie mistakes that his more experienced friends and paralegal manage to undo. He makes up in zeal what he lacks in experience, though. The residents of Orbit come together around Ermeline and her son to protect them as much as they can, showing some of the best reasons to live in a small town. Readers of legal thrillers will especially like this book.



·         Paperback: 262 pages
·         Publisher: Subjudica House (January 15, 2014)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 0615953778
·         ISBN-13: 978-0615953779




Aubrey Hamilton ©2018
Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal It projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Sunday, January 20, 2019

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 1/20/19

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 1/20/19

SleuthSayers: Police Training by O'Neil De Noux

SleuthSayers: Police Training: Police Training in the 21st Century by O'Neil De Noux The cover story of the  Fraternal Order of Police Journal's  December 2018...

RTE Update for January 19, 2019


The January 19 2019 issue of RTE is out and includes new reviews as well as an interview from the archive:

http://www.reviewingtheevidence.com                    

A repeat of a previous interview with Reginald Hill in the 'Sixty Seconds with . . .' interview hot seat:


This, the first issue for 2019, includes a list of the reviewers' most memorable book of 2018.

            
                            
REVIEWS THIS WEEK:

TOMBLAND    C.J. Sansom    Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

UNEASY LIES THE CROWN    Tasha Alexander    Reviewed by Cathy Downs

A SORROWFUL SANCTUARY    Iona Whishaw    Reviewed by Lourdes Venard

SMILE OF THE WOLF    Tim Leach    Reviewed by Meg Westley

THE LEGACY    Yrsa Sigurdardottir     Reviewed by Anne Corey

RUPTURE    Ragnar Jónasson    Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

LIVES LAID AWAY    Stephen Mack Jones    Reviewed by Susan Hoover

SCRUBLANDS    Chris Hammer     Reviewed by Meredith Frazier

THE NEW IBERIA BLUES    James Lee Burke    Reviewed by Anne Corey

  FALL DOWN DEAD    Stephen Booth    Reviewed by Jim Napier

THE SPITE GAME    Anna Snoekstra    Reviewed by Keshena Hanson

NO MERCY    Joanna Schaffhausen    Reviewed by Susan Hoover

NO PLACE FOR WOLVERINES      Dave Butler    Reviewed by Sharon Mensing

ONE TASTE TOO MANY    Debra H. Goldstein    Reviewed by PJ Coldren    

CREWEL AND UNUSUAL    Molly MacRae    Reviewed by PJ Coldren

We post more than 900 new reviews a year -- all of them are archived on  the site -- as well as a new interview with a top author every issue.

Yvonne Klein

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Case of the Corporal's Leave (1945) by Christo...

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Case of the Corporal's Leave (1945) by Christo...: The Case of the Corporal's Leave (1945) is Christopher Bush 's twenty-ninth mystery novel about his two detectives, Ludovic Trav...

Mystery Fanfare: Mystery Bytes: Quirky & Interesting Mystery & Book...

Mystery Fanfare: Mystery Bytes: Quirky & Interesting Mystery & Book...: Here's my Round-Up of interesting and sometimes quirky mystery-related links on the Internet . Just wanted to share in case you missed...

Lesa's Book Critiques: Have You Heard? - Donna Andrews' The Penguin Who Knew Too Much

Lesa's Book Critiques: Have You Heard? - Donna Andrews' The Penguin Who Knew Too Much

KRL This Week Update for 1/19/18


Up in KRL this morning a review and giveaway of "The Whispered Word" by Ellery Adams along with a fun recipe from Ellery

And a review and ebook giveaway of "Spiked" by Avery Daniels

We also have a review and giveaway of "The Coloring Crook" by Krista Davis long with a fun guest post by Krista about the coloring craze

And a review and giveaway of "Gone Fishing in Lottawatah" by Evelyn David aka Marian Borden and Rhonda Dossett and an interesting guest post by them about writing as a team

And a review and ebook giveaway of "The Mortality of Matias" by Annette Moncheri and an interesting interview with Annette

We also have a mystery short story by Ilene Schneider 

Up on KRL News and Reviews this morning we have a review and giveaway of "Catch Me If Yukon" by Maddy Hunter

And a review and giveaway of "Death's Favorite Child" by Frankie Y. Bailey

And a review and giveaway of "A Vintage Death" by Mary Ellen Hughes

Happy reading,
Lorie 

Saturday, January 19, 2019

Sandi's Birthday--January 19, 2019

Sandi--October 2014

If life would have gone right, she would be here to celebrate her 59th birthday today. The fact that she is not hurts deeply and continues to be a devestating loss for all of us.

Friday, January 18, 2019

Beneath the Stains of Time: Death Knell (1945) by Baynard Kendrick

Beneath the Stains of Time: Death Knell (1945) by Baynard Kendrick: Baynard Kendrick was a detective novelist and one of the founding members of the Mystery Writers of America, even serving as their first...

Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Division Bell Mystery by Ellen Wilkinson

Friday’s Forgotten Book: The Division Bell Mystery by Ellen Wilkinson

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: UNCLE AND ANTS TOUR AND GIVEAWAY

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: UNCLE AND ANTS TOUR AND GIVEAWAY: Don't miss the giveaway at the end of the post! Uncle and Ants A Silicon Valley Mystery Book 1 by Marc Jedel Genre:...

FFB Review: MISCHIEF IN MAGGODY (1988) by Joan Hess Reviewed by Barry Ergang

For the full list of reading suggestions today, make sure you head over to Patti’s blog.

MISCHIEF IN MAGGODY (1988) by Joan Hess
Reviewed by Barry Ergang


The second novel in Joan Hess’s comical mystery series, Mischief in Maggody is primarily but not exclusively concerned with the disappearance and eventual murder of Robin Buchanon, one of many of the Buchanon clan inhabitants of Maggody, Arkansas, population 755: “There are hundreds of them sprinkled across Stump County, worse than hogweed. Incest and inbreeding are their favorite hobbies…They aren’t strong on intelligence; the most they can aspire to is animal cunning. An anthropologist from Farber College once tried to sort out the genealogy, although nobody ever figured out why anybody’d want to do that. Rumor has it she tried to kill herself at the county line, and ranted in the ambulance about third cousins twice removed and fathers who were also uncles and half-brothers. Her family hushed it up with some story about a diesel truck, but everybody in Maggody knew better.”

 Ariel “Arly” Hanks, who was raised here but eventually married, moved to Manhattan, ultimately divorced, and moved back to Maggody where she has become Chief of Police, has quite a number of problems to contend with, not the least of which in her current case, is the well-being of loose-morals moonshiner Robin Buchanon’s five children, one of whom is an infant.  

Arly and/or the reader will also encounter—via first- and third-person viewpoints—in no particular order—Madame Celeste, a psychic who may or  may  not be phony; Celeste’s brother, obliging Mason Dickerson; Brother Verber, preacher at the Voice of the Almighty Lord Assembly Hall; school counselor David Allen Wainwright; Arly’s mother Ruby Bee and  Ruby’s friend Estelle Oppers; the consummately inept Kevin Buchanon and his lady love, Dahlia O’Neill; student Carol Alice Plummer and her “best friend in the whole world,” Heather Riley; and the new hippie owners of the Emporium: Nate, Rainbow, Zachery and Poppy, the latter being very pregnant. Extremely memorable is Maggody’s mayoral wife and devout Christian known throughout as “Mrs. Jim Bob,” and occasionally as Mizzoner,her  husband Mayor Jim Bob being off in a conference in Hot Springs.

A modern take on the screwball comedy mystery that Craig Rice might have loved—albeit with some implied sexuality and blatant  raw street language—the novel is one I can recommend to non-squeamish readers of entertaining whodunits.



© 2019 Barry Ergang

As regular readers of this blog know, some of Derringer-winner Barry Ergang’s work is available at Amazon and Smashwords. His free e-book Criminalities includes the essay “Impossible Pleasures,” about impossible crime fiction.

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 24 Paying Markets for Blog Posts

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 24 Paying Markets for Blog Posts: Pixabay There are a gazillion blogs out there. Yours is probably one of them. But not all blogs are created equal. Some get considerably...

Bitter Tea and Mystery: Beyond a Reasonable Doubt: C. W. Grafton

Bitter Tea and Mystery: Beyond a Reasonable Doubt: C. W. Grafton: Jess London, a young lawyer, murders his despicable brother-in-law. When London's sister is suspected of the crime, he confesses to the ...

TPWD: Game Warden Field Notes for 1/17/19

TPWD: Game Warden Field Notes for 1/17/19

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Leadership, Lobsters, Snap, Burnable B...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Leadership, Lobsters, Snap, Burnable B...: Reported by Kristin Leadership in Turbulent Times by Doris Kearns Goodwin received a rousing review from our first Nevermor...

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: #NEW RELEASE -- GARNET #GIVEAWAY

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: #NEW RELEASE -- GARNET #GIVEAWAY: Yee Haw! Today is release day for GARNET , The Widows of Wildcat Ridge, book 9. I’m so excited about this book and I hope readers will be ...

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 01/16/19

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 01/16/19

Only days left to win books and more from KRL!


Only days left to win of another great group of mysteries-"The Name of the
Rosé": A Rose Avenue Wine Club Mystery By Christine E. Blum, "Slay in
Character": A Cat Latimer Mystery by Lynn Cahoon, "Hooks Can Be Deceiving":
A Crochet Mystery by Betty Hechtman, "Botched 4 Murder": A Sophie Kimball
Mysteries by J.C. Eaton, "A Moment in Crime": A Santa Fe Revival Mystery by
Amanda Allen, "Downright Dead": A B&B Spirits Mystery by Pamela Kopfler

And to win an ebook of "Tandem Demise" by Duffy Brown and while there check
out a fun guest post by her about her love of books

Also to win a copy of "Back Stabbers" by Julie Mulhern published by Henery

And to win a signed copy of "The Pot Thief Who Studies Edward Abbey" by J.
Michael Orenduff

Happy reading,
Lorie

Tips for Writing About Controversial Topics in Fiction | WritersDigest.com

Tips for Writing About Controversial Topics in Fiction | WritersDigest.com: Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling novelist Bryan Gruley offers his best tips for writing about controversial topics—social, political and otherwise—in your fiction.

Do Some Damage: The Evil We All Do by David Nemeth

Do Some Damage: The Evil We All Do: By David Nemeth Prior to 2004, Google brought forth the idea of "don't be evil". Some held hope that this would come true...

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

2018 Critters Readers' Poll--Final Count


The final count is in at the Critters Poll and this blog finished in second place in the Review Site category. The poll this year contained several mega sites and Kevin's Corner in a far smaller field of review sites than in years past. While we do not review what the first place finisher does--paranormal books and other paranormal content-- this blog is the clear number one favorite for mysteries, crime fiction, and such.

The poll results also marks the same second place finish as last year. Considering what has gone on this past year and the struggle it has been for me to keep this blog going, finishing second, even in a far smaller field, still feels like a major accomplishment. I could not have kept the blog going without the help of many other people who provided not only content, but support on days that were often very dark.

On behalf of  regular contributors Barry Ergang, Aubrey Nye Hamilton, Kaye George, Earl Staggs, and numerous guests in the past year, as well as yours truly, we thank you for your support.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Monday, January 14, 2019

Lesa's Book Critiques: Sandie's Corner - No Sunscreen for the Dead by Tim Dorsey

Lesa's Book Critiques: Sandie's Corner - No Sunscreen for the Dead by Tim Dorsey

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Dumplin’ vs Dumplin’

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Dumplin’ vs Dumplin’: Reviewed by Christy             In the past when I’ve watched a movie then read the book, I’ve usually ended up liking both. ...

Do Some Damage: The Widows, by Jess Montgomery

Do Some Damage: The Widows, by Jess Montgomery: I’m delighted to welcome Jess Montgomery to Do Some Damage. Jess and I met at the 2017 Bouchercon in Toronto, and it immediately felt like w...

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 69

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 69

Beneath the Stains of Time: Balbane, the Conjurer Detective: "The Twisted Bull...

Beneath the Stains of Time: Balbane, the Conjurer Detective: "The Twisted Bull...: Lewen Hewitt is a little-known, long-since forgotten mystery writer of short stories, whose work was mostly published in Detective Story ...

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 1/14/19

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 1/14/19

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar January 14...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar January 14...: Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of January 14-20, 2019:  Special Events: "Say it Loud" The John Silverstein Collectio...

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 1/14/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 1/14/19

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: The Girl at the Deep End of the Lake by Sam Lee Jackson


Finding a new mystery or thriller that I like is a great way to start the new year. How have I not heard of these books before? The Girl at the Deep End of the Lake by Sam Lee Jackson (Piping Rock Publications, 2016) is an exciting start in a series featuring Jackson and Blackhawk, two former covert operations agents who moved to unsuspecting Phoenix, Arizona. Jackson sustained permanent injuries in his last fire fight and is now living quietly on a boat, occupying his time with fishing, swimming, and reading. He’s awakened one night by a couple of thugs who are dumping a plastic-wrapped girl in his lake. Jackson has a wide streak of the rescuer in his psyche, and he immediately dives in and drags her out with the help of another lake-side resident.

The girl tells Jackson a story full of holes but sufficient for him to understand she’s associated with one of the local gangs and that she is in danger, even if she doesn’t realize how much. When she disappears the next day, Jackson goes looking for her and the story takes off.

Fast-moving and full of fresh, interesting characters, not the least of which is Jackson himself. (Although, really, the author couldn’t think of a different name?) He has re-invented himself, it’s clear, as one of the law enforcement officials he encounters points out that there is no paperwork or history on him preceding the purchase of his houseboat. He’s quixotic and not particularly observant of laws if they are inconvenient. His problem-solving approach combines the loyalty and ruthlessness of Joe Pike with the wit and affability of Spenser. Also presented for our consideration are a Catholic priest who runs an underfunded women’s shelter in the worst part of the city, a South American consul searching for his granddaughter, a singer in a local night club who wants to fix Jackson up with her best friend, and gangbangers aplenty. There are enough bar-room brawls and shootouts to satisfy the bloodlust of any reader, as well as the obligatory romance.

I enjoyed this book so much I am afraid to pick up the next in the series for fear it won’t be as good as this one. Highly recommended.



·         Paperback: 332 pages
·         Publisher: Piping Rock Publications (August 5, 2016)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 0999852620
·         ISBN-13: 978-0999852620
·         Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.8 x 8 inches



Aubrey Hamilton ©2018
Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal It projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Gumshoe Review January 2019 issue online


Gumshoe Review January 2019 now Online @

Editorial License:
Just the Facts - January 2019 by Gayle Surrette

Columns:
US Books
News
Conventions

Short Fiction Reviews:
Deadly Engagement (Mapleton Mystery #6) by Terry Odell

US Book Reviews:
The Big Book of Female Detectives edited by Otto Penzler
Bleak Harbor by Bryan Gruley
First, Kill the Lawyers (Holland Taylor) by David Housewright
A Study in Treason (Daughter of Sherlock Holmes) by Leonard Goldberg
The Vanishing Season (Ellery Hathaway) by Joanna Schaffhausen
-- 
Gayle Surrette
Brandywine, MD 20613