Saturday, July 20, 2019

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: ORPHAN TRAIN BRIDES #newrelease

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: ORPHAN TRAIN BRIDES #newrelease: Do you have a special friend you met online? Jacquie Rogers and I met online and have since met in person several times. She is a fun pe...

KRL This Week Update for 7/20/19

Up in KRL this morning a review and giveaway of "Bite Club" by Laurien Berenson

We also have reviews and giveaways of another fun group of mysteries-"Down in Flames": A Webb’s Glass Shop Mystery by Cheryl Hollon, "Guilty as Charred": A Cook-Off Mystery by Devon Delaney, "Left Fur Dead": A Jules & Bun Mystery by J.M. Griffin, "Seeing Red": A Red Herring Mystery by Dana Dratch, and "Murder’s No Votive Confidence": A Nantucket Candle Maker Mystery by Christin Brecher

And a review of season 5 of "Shetland"

And a review and ebook giveaway of "Answers in the Attic" by Kathi Daley 

And also a review and giveaway of "Cherry Scones & Broken Bones" by Darci Hannah along with an interesting interview with Darci

For those who prefer to listen to Mysteryrat's Maze Podcast directly on KRL we have a player of the latest one here-"Sifting Through Clues" by Daryl Wood Gerber. And we also have a contest for a chance to win a copy of the book

Up on KRL News this week we have a review and giveaway of "Chai Another Day" by Leslie Budewitz

And a review and ebook giveaway of "Game Town" by Janet Elizabeth Lynn and Will Zeilinger

And a review and giveaway of "Atlanta Deathwatch" by Ralph Dennis, published by Brash Books

Happy reading,
Lorie 


The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 7/19/19

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 7/19/19

Bookbrowsing Blog: What’s a publicist to do? by PJ Nunn

Bookbrowsing Blog: What’s a publicist to do? by PJ Nunn

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Death at Whitewater Church : An Inishowen Mystery...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Death at Whitewater Church : An Inishowen Mystery...: Reviewed by Jeanne Irish solicitor Benedicta O’Keeffe accompanies Paul Doherty on a survey of Whitewater Church, an old and decons...

Scott's Take: Secret Hero Society: Science Fair Crisis by Derek Fridolfs, Pamela Lovas, and Shane Clester


Secret Hero Society: Science Fair Crisis by Derek Fridolfs, Pamela Lovas, and Shane Clester is a book aimed at the middle school or pre-teen reader.  It comes to readers from the DC Universe and features the superheroes when they were kids and members of the “Junior Detective Club.” The members include Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Aquaman and other superheroes when they were kids and investigating mysteries around their school. Secret Hero Society: Science Fair is the fourth book in the series and this time the science fair is at risk because somebody keeps sabotaging it.

The story is presented through various ways by using letters, illustrations, journal writings, texts, emails and more. This book is fun and has an enjoyable story featuring cameos of good and bad people from the DC Universe where here they are students, teachers, and more. There are various jokes made that if a person is familiar with the DC universe are funny. While the artwork in this one is not nearly as good as the earlier books, the characterizations established earlier in the series remains true

Therefore, it does make sense that a middle school aged Batman is very interested in forensic science and is always very secretive and a young Aquaman is interested in sea life and is part of the swim team. This deal works with the adults as well as James Gordon, instead of being a police captain, is a strict and fair principal. Alec Holland (aka Swamp Thing) is a biology teacher with a focus on plants. One of the PE teachers is the mercenary known as Sports Master and is really good at sports. Here he is on the straight and narrow. In the comics where he is also really good at sports, he wears a hockey mask and uses his sports skills to commit crimes.

Basically, this book and series is just a kid appropriate version of the Justice League. In these tales, the authors deal with subjects important to the primary reading audience such as bullying and other school problems. Those issues are raised in the background while a pretty good mystery keeps kids reading. If you have a child who likes mysteries and the DC Universe, this kid friendly story would be a good match. Secret Hero Society: Science Fair Crisis by Derek Fridolfs, Pamela Lovas, and Shane Clester is just fun.

This October, the fifth book in the series titled, Secret Hero Society: The Field Trip Disaster by this same writing and artwork team. The series begins with the 2016 book, The Study Hall of Justice.



Secret Hero Society: Science Fair Crisis
Derek Fridolfs, Pamela Lovas, Shane Clester
Scholastic
2019
ISBN#978-1-338-27328-1
Hardback (also available in paperback and digital formats)
176 Pages
$12.99

Material supplied by the good folks of the Dallas Public Library System. My copy came from the Skillman Southwestern Branch.

Scott A. Tipple ©2019

Friday, July 19, 2019

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Case with Nine Solutions (1928) by J.J. Connington

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Case with Nine Solutions (1928) by J.J. Connin...: " J.J. Connington " was the pseudonym of Professor Alfred W. Stuart, a Scottish chemist and lecturer, who produced close to th...

Lesa's Book Critiques: Winners and A Secret Giveaway

Lesa's Book Critiques: Winners and A Secret Giveaway

FFB Review: The Philadelphia Quarry by Howard Owen

After a recent unplanned hospital stay and complications from that as I am still not back to my crummy normal, FFB here finally returns today with an all new review from yours truly. This is the second book in a series that started with Oregon Hill. This is a series that should be read in order. For more reading suggestions, make sure you head over to Todd Mason’s Sweet Freedom blog.

As we learned in the first book of this series, Oregon Hill, reporter Willie Black is not one to back off the story even when his bosses or the powerful elite order him to do so. While those in charge may think it is a character flaw, like his drinking, others would see it as his way of being principled when justice is being denied. The same is true in The Philadelphia Quarry where a wrongfully convicted man is once again arrested for a crime he did not commit.

In August 1983 in the good city of Richmond, Virginia, Richard Slade was arrested for the rape of sixteen year old Ashley Simpson. In May of 1984 he was convicted on little evidence and sent to prison. In the middle of January 2011, he was finally released when DNA evidence proved without a shadow of a doubt that he did not do it despite the fact that Ashley Simpson identified him as her rapist those many years ago. Her accusation was the main evidence against him at the time.

Did she make a horrible mistake or did she deliberately lie?

The Innocence Project may have successfully proven the point that Mr. Slade was innocent of the crime of rape, but nothing can restore Mr. Slade’s reputation in the minds of many or undo what Mr. Slade has gone through all these years in prison.  As he was held for a crime he did not do, his reputation took a beating over the years, in large part, due to scathing editorials that came out in the same newspaper that Willie Black works for as a reporter. The paper, through those editorials, has been very vocal in the belief that Mr. Slade was guilty and a threat to the community. Then, as in now, many people did not understand that editorial writers and news reporters share little in common other than being employed by the same paper.

Decades ago, reporter Willie Black worked the night crime beat and reported on the case from the start. All these years later he is back on that same crime beat and thus back on the story of Richard Slade and the victim, Ashley Simpson.  In the hours following Mr. Slade’s release, Willie Black is trying to do follow ups with the two principals and isn’t getting any traction with either one of them. Simpson and her well connected family want their privacy while Mr. Slade’s family sees Willie Black as the enemy thanks to the editorials from the paper.

He is getting nowhere at all and then everything changes. Within hours of Mr. Slade’s release, Simpson is shot and dies. Who has the best motive to kill her? A man recently released from prison after being convicted of a rape he did not do or somebody else?  Within hours of her death, Richard Slade is again arrested for a crime he did not commit. The elite and powerful close ranks and before long Willie is being asked to choose employment over chasing a story that is clearly going in a different direction than his bosses would like.  

The Philadelphia Quarry is a powerful sequel to Oregon Hill. It is a timeless crime fiction tale with plenty of twists and turns. Set in the twin dying worlds of journalism and newspapers, the read powers along at a steady clip while also delivering societal observations that are even more relevant today six years after publication. It is also a mighty good mystery read. 



The Philadelphia Quarry
Howard Owen
The Permanent Press
July 2013
ISBN# 978-1-57962-335-7
Hardback (also available in audio, digital, and paper formats)
240 Pages

Material was received and read by way of the Interlibrary Loan Program where a copy owned by the Rockwall County Library System was shared with the Dallas Public Library System.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2019

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Funny by way of Barry Ergang


Chess, Comics, Crosswords, Books, Music, Cinema: Memory Man by David Baldacci, 2015

Chess, Comics, Crosswords, Books, Music, Cinema: Memory Man by David Baldacci, 2015: Amos Decker is Memory Man. The bearded and massively-built protagonist—a former homicide detective-turned-private investigator-turned-pol...

The Rap Sheet: A Midweek Mixed Bag

The Rap Sheet: A Midweek Mixed Bag

Bronzeville Bee: Horror Reflections: The Dark Half by Stephen King

Bronzeville Bee: Horror Reflections: The Dark Half by Stephen King

Bitter Tea and Mystery: Pearls before Swine: Margery Allingham

Bitter Tea and Mystery: Pearls before Swine: Margery Allingham: I am rereading the Albert Campion series by Margery Allingham in order, although I have been tempted to skip over a few of the books and mov...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Democracy, James Baldwin, Owen Meany, ...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Democracy, James Baldwin, Owen Meany, ...: Reported by Ambrea This week, Nevermore started out their conversation with a work of nonfiction titled How Democracies Die by St...

In Reference to Murder: Mystery Melange for 7/17/19

In Reference to Murder: Mystery Melange for 7/17/19

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Texas Highways: Big Bend Fossils Reveal New Dinosaur Species

Texas Highways: Big Bend Fossils Reveal New Dinosaur Species

Bronzeville Bee: Recent Latina Books Inspired by Folklore and Mythology

Bronzeville Bee: Recent Latina Books Inspired by Folklore and Mythology

SleuthSayers Blog: Community Standards by Michael Bracken

SleuthSayers: Community Standards: By Michael Bracken This year’s Malice Domestic in North Bethesda, Maryland, provided ample opportunity to spend time with several writers ...

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 10 Paying Markets for Mystery and Crime Stories

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 10 Paying Markets for Mystery and Crime Stories: Hercule Poirot, Flickr, Jose Camoes Silva Mysteries and thrillers are perennial favorites among readers. According to Simba Information,...

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Romance Rehab: Why authors who rely on Facebook ads to sell books are in serious danger

Romance Rehab: Why authors who rely on Facebook ads to sell books are in serious danger

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Gates of Hell (2003) by Paul Doherty

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Gates of Hell (2003) by Paul Doherty: Last year, I tackled the first two parts of Paul Doherty 's historical "Telamon Triology," The House of Death (2001) and T...

Buried Under Books Book Review: Dig Your Grave by Steven Cooper

Buried Under Books Book Review: Dig Your Grave by Steven Cooper

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Blood Water Paint by Joy McCullough

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Blood Water Paint by Joy McCullough: Reviewed by Christy             Artemisia Gentileschi was a talented painter in the 1600s, unusual for a woman at the time. Sh...

Monday, July 15, 2019

The Bronzeville Bee: Great Writing by Sandra Ruttan

The Bronzeville Bee: Great Writing by Sandra Ruttan

Lesa's Book Critiques: Heather Webber, An Interview

Lesa's Book Critiques: Heather Webber, An Interview

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: GROUNDWORK FOR MURDER

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: GROUNDWORK FOR MURDER: This post is part of a virtual book tour organized by Goddess Fish Promotions . T he authors will be awarding a 16X20 Signed Matted Prin...

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Case of the Fourth Detective (1951) by Christo...

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Case of the Fourth Detective (1951) by Christo...: The Case of the Fourth Detective (1951) is the thirty-ninth mystery novel about Christopher Bush 's intelligent and urbane series-de...

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 7/15/19

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 7/15/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 7/15/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 7/15/19

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar July 15-21...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar July 15-21...: Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of July 15-21, 2019 compiled exclusively for  Lone Star Literary Life  by Texas Book Lover. SPE...

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: Sayonara Slam by Naomi Hirahara


Sayonara Slam by Naomi Hirahara (Prospect Park Books, 2016) is the sixth book in this award-winning series led by an irritable semi-retired Japanese-American gardener in his 80s named Mas Arai who just wants to be left alone. Instead, his daughter, son-in-law, and grandson live with him, interfering with Mas’s potential plans to ask his girlfriend to move in with him and generally complicating his life.

The son-in-law has finally gotten a good job as head groundskeeper at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, and Mas is helping him out during the World Baseball Classic series where Korea and Japan are playing. An obnoxious Japanese sportswriter from an unsavory publication drops dead among the crowd of spectators and journalists jostling for position near the dugout. Mas ends up answering questions from the police instead of watching the game, since he was helping pass water among the group.

The grandson of Mas’s childhood girlfriend arrives from Japan a couple of days later ostensibly to take over the dead sportswriter’s job and hires Mas as chauffeur and translator. In reality Yuki is investigating what has turned out to be a homicide. The victim’s computer files are missing and just what he was working on isn’t clear. Some signs point to the dead journalist dabbling in blackmail on the side. Mas’s unwillingness to explain his relationship to Yuki’s grandmother to Mas’s current girlfriend creates a possible turning point in their lives.

This is a leisurely mystery, perhaps not for everyone, no car chases and no shoot-outs, but it is a fine read about people who sound authentic. It holds a great deal of history woven into the background of the story, Japan and Korean political relationships, Hiroshima and World War II survivors, prisoner exchanges, but none of it obtrusive. Other reviewers suggest starting at the beginning of the series for a fuller picture of the characters and their backgrounds.




·         Paperback: 280 pages
·         Publisher: Prospect Park Books LLC - Prospect Park Books (April 26, 2016)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 1938849736
·         ISBN-13: 978-1938849732


Aubrey Hamilton ©2019

Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal It projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Sunday, July 14, 2019

RTE Update: RTE for July 13

The July 13 2019 issue of RTE is out and includes fifteen new reviews and a new interview.


Our guest in the "Sixty Seconds" spot this week is Donis Casey:


                                        REVIEWS THIS WEEK:

BIG SKY    Kate Atkinson    Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

CONVICTION    Denise Mina    Reviewed by Barbara Fister

UNDER THE COLD BRIGHT LIGHTS    Garry Disher    Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

THE CHAIN    Adrian McKinty    Reviewed by Barbara Fister

WHEREVER SHE GOES    Kelley Armstrong    Reviewed by Keshena Hanson

BROKEN GROUND    Val McDermid     Reviewed by Jim Napier

THE NEW GIRL    Daniel Silva    Reviewed by Anne Corey

ALMOST MIDNIGHT    Paul Doiron    Reviewed by Sharon Mensing

ARCHES ENEMY    Scott Graham    Reviewed by Sharon Mensing

SHOOT THE BASTARDS    Michael Stanley    Reviewed by Susan Hoover

MAN OF THE YEAR    Caroline Louise Walker    Reviewed by Susan Hoover

THE ALCHEMIST OF LOST SOULS      Mary Lawrence     Reviewed by Lourdes 
Venard

A LADY'S GUIDE  TO GOSSIP
AND MURDER    Dianne Freeman     Reviewed by Lourdes Venard

CHAI ANOTHER DAY    Leslie Budewitz    Reviewed by PJ Coldren

HEART OF BARKNESS    Spencer Quinn    Reviewed by Diana Borse


We post more than 900 new reviews a year -- all of them are archived on the site -- as well as a new interview with a top author every issue.

Yvonne Klein

Lesa's Book Critiques: Have You Heard? - Miranda James' Classified as Murder

Lesa's Book Critiques: Have You Heard? - Miranda James' Classified as Murder

Crime Review Update: New issue of Crime Review

We feature new 20 reviews in each issue of Crime Review (www.crimereview.co.uk), together with a top industry interview. This time it’s author Michael Koryta in the Countdown hot seat:



We’re on Twitter at:

Crime Review: @CrimeReviewUK

Linda Wilson: @CrimeReviewer

Sharon Wheeler: @lartonmedia



This week’s reviews are:

DEADLAND by William Shaw, reviewed by John Cleal

Two youngsters steal a phone – whose owner is willing to kill to recover
it. DS Alex Cupidi, tasked with solving the mystery of a decomposing arm in
an art gallery exhibition, uncovers a link between the crimes.



STONE COLD HEART by Caz Frear, reviewed by Linda Wilson

When a young woman is found dead not long after a party, there’s not
exactly a shortage of possible suspects for DS Cat Kinsella to wade through.



SHE LIES IN WAIT by Gytha Lodge, reviewed by Madeleine Marsh

The discovery of a body brings together the victim’s schoolfriends 30 years
after her death and old secrets start to be uncovered.



STASI 1977 by David Young, reviewed by Chris Roberts

Major Karin Muller of the Volkspolizei is called back from leave to
investigate a murder in a state cotton mill, but soon finds that the Stasi
have an interest and are determined to block her progress in the case.



THE MIDDLE TEMPLE MURDER by JS Fletcher, reviewed by John Cleal

An unidentified elderly man is found bludgeoned to death in London’s Middle
Temple. The police believe it was simple robbery, but journalist Frank
Spargo, who stumbles on the death scene, joins forces with a Scotland Yard
detective and a young barrister.



SMALLBONE DECEASED by Michael Gilbert, reviewed by Chris Roberts

The London legal firm of Horniman, Birley and Craine suffers a blow to its
reputation when a client is found dead in an office deed box.



ROBERT B PARKER’S OLD BLACK MAGIC by Ace Atkins, reviewed by Linda Wilson

Boston PI Spenser is called in to investigate a theft, 20 years ago, from
an art museum in the city and is soon plunged into the at times murky world
of high-end art.



LOST CREED by Alex Kava, reviewed by John Cleal

A child trafficking bust sets K9 handler Ryder Creed on a search for his
missing sister.


A GIFT FOR DYING by MJ Arlidge, reviewed by Kati Barr-Taylor

A serial killer is prowling Chicago, and teenager Kassie knows where he
will strike next.



THE HAVEN by Simon Lelic, reviewed by Linda Wilson

When 13-year-old Ollie Turner’s guardian is murdered, he’s taken in by a
group of kids living a separate life under the streets of London and has to
fight to prevent chaos and destruction being brought to the city’s streets.



BLACK WOLF by GD Abson, reviewed by Chris Roberts

It is only chance that a body left by the roadside outside St Petersburg in
early January is discovered before the snow buries it for the rest of the
winter. Captain Natalya Ivanova is assigned the case.



SHADOW by James Swallow, reviewed by John Cleal

Marc Dane and his partner, ex-Delta Force sniper Lucy Keyes, must thwart a
plot by an international group to use extremist right wingers to unleash a
lethal virus in a major European city.



ONCE A PILGRIM by James Deegan, reviewed by Linda Wilson

Former SAS hard man John Carr is now working in private security, his army
days behind him, or so he thinks, but some wars never entirely end, as
events early in Carr’s military career come back to haunt him and his
former comrades.



THE DIVINITIES by Parker Bilal, reviewed by Chris Roberts

Detective Sergeant Cal Drake gets an opportunity to restore his tarnished
reputation with the help of forensic psychologist Dr Ray Crane.



THE TEAHOUSE DETECTIVE by Baroness Orczy, reviewed by John Cleal

A collection of short stories, each with a puzzle to solve.



BLOOD WILL HAVE BLOOD by Catherine Moloney, reviewed by Arnold Taylor

A brutal murder occurs at the school where DI Markham's girlfriend works.
In spite of criticism from his Chief Inspector, Markham insists on carrying
out an investigation into the school staff.



MALICE IN MALMO by Torquil MacLeod, reviewed by Ewa Sherman

Inspector Anita Sundstrom of the Skane County Police is under pressure. She
has to deal with evidence-less cases of kidnapped businessmen and a murder
of an infamous journalist. Her boss is in hospital, replaced by Anita’s
nemesis, and her long-distance boyfriend is suddenly too close.



THE BROKEN TOKEN (audiobook) by Chris Nickson, reviewed by Fiona Spence

When Richard Nottingham, Constable of Leeds, discovers his former housemaid murdered in a particularly sickening manner, his professional and personal lives move perilously close to each other.



STRANGE TOMBS by Syd Moore, reviewed by Anthea Hawdon

There's a mystery and suspense residential creative writing week at
Ratchette Hall. It's at Halloween, so what could possibly go wrong? Well,
murder for a start.



PERFECT CRIME by Helen Fields, reviewed by John Barnbrook

It seems that there is a serial killer at work in Edinburgh who is
specifically targeting people who have attempted suicide and murdering them
with sophisticated cruelty.



Best wishes


Sharon