Monday, April 30, 2018

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: TEXAS LITERARY CALENDAR April 30-M...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: TEXAS LITERARY CALENDAR April 30-M...: Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of April 30-May 6, 2018:  Special Events: Writefest , Houston, April 30-May 6 Austin Book Awards...

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 4/30/18

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers  for 4/30/18

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: Midsummer Malice by M. D. Lake

Midsummer Malice by Allen Simpson writing as M.D. Lake (Avon, 1997) is the ninth mystery featuring Peggy O’Neill, a law enforcement officer at an unnamed Minnesota university on the Mississippi River. Simpson was a professor of Scandinavian literature at the University of Minnesota and then retired to write full time. Between 1989 and 1999 he released 10 O’Neill mysteries, winning the American Mystery Award for best original paperback in 1992 for the fourth in the series, Poisoned Ivy.

On her usual night patrol of the campus Peggy runs into Steadman George, a local shady character known for his piano-playing, tall tales, and drinking. He offers her a story about an off-the-books baby adoption he brokered 20 years ago and asks her what he should do if the biological mother returns and wants to meet her now grown daughter but doesn’t know where she is. He insists that the situation is hypothetical but gives enough corroborative detail to make Peggy think otherwise and to suggest he intends to somehow profit from it.

When Steadman’s alcohol-filled body is pulled from the Mississippi a couple of nights later, only Peggy thinks the death is not as accidental as it seems. She wanted to believe that Steadman was truly on the wagon this time, as he had claimed. In addition, she saw the silhouette of a second person in Steadman’s quarters on the old riverboat he lived on the night he died, but none of his usual cronies admitted seeing him then. Fearing the birth mother who has come back to check on her daughter is also in danger, Peggy begins a frantic search for her and for proof that Steadman’s drowning was deliberate.

As much of a narrative analysis of the age-old issues surrounding adoption as a police procedural, the story vividly portrays the perspectives of the birth mother, adoptive mother, and the adopted daughter in addition to Peggy’s investigative process. The question of to tell or not to tell about the adoption is examined from all sides. Of course this book pre-dates the recent explosion of DNA testing services, which has only created more questions and more surprises for the people in the adoption triangle.

A solid entry in a series that has been too soon forgotten.


·         Mass Market Paperback: 265 pages
·         Publisher: Avon (December 1, 1997)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 0380787598
·         ISBN-13: 978-0380787593



Aubrey Hamilton ©2018

Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal IT projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Amazing Stories: 2018 SF/F ON TV—MY PERSONAL TAKE by Steve Fahnestalk

Amazing Stories: 2018 SF/F ON TV—MY PERSONAL TAKE by Steve Fahnestalk 

Author Jim Nesbitt Reviews A Black Sail by Rich Zahradnik

Author Jim Nesbitt Reviews A Black Sail by Rich Zahradnik

KRL Update for 4/28/18

Up in KRL this morning a review & giveaway of "Murder of the Maestro" by Anna
Celeste Burke
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/28/murder-of-the-maestro-by-anna-celeste-burke/


And reviews & giveaways of 4 more fun mysteries-"Bad Neighbors": An Agnes
and Effie Mystery by Maia Chance, "Plain Confessions": An Amish Mystery by
Emma Miller, "Santa Fe Mourning": A Santa Fe Revival Mystery by Amanda
Allen, and "Til Death Do Us Party": A Live and Di in Dixie Mystery by Vickie
Fee http://kingsriverlife.com/04/28/end-of-april-mystery-catch-up/


Also a review of a mystery short story collection perfect for spring,
"Pushing Up Daises" and an ebook giveaway of 6 mystery novels by authors in
the collection
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/28/pushing-up-daisies-a-spring-short-story-collection/


We also have the latest mystery coming attractions from Sunny Frazier,
along with a giveaway of a book from a past coming attractions, "Hummus and
Homicide" by Tina Kashian
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/28/coming-attractions-questionable-climate-conditions-edition/


And a review & giveaway of "Murder at the Bus Depot" by Judy Alter along
with an interesting interview with Judy
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/28/murder-at-the-bus-depot-by-judy-alter/



And if you enjoy fantasy with your mystery, up in KRL News and Reviews we
have a review & giveaway of "Lady Henterman's Wardrobe" by Marshall Ryan
Maresca
http://www.krlnews.com/2018/04/lady-hentermans-wardrobe-by-marshall-ryan-maresca.html
Happy reading,
Lorie

Mystery Fanfare: BOOKSTORE MYSTERIES: Independent Bookstore Day

Mystery Fanfare: BOOKSTORE MYSTERIES: Independent Bookstore Day: For Independent Bookstore Day, I put together a list of Bookstore Mysteries . This list is no where near complete, and I invite you to c...

Lesa's Latest Contest: An exotic getaway for mystery readers

This week, I'm giving away mysteries set in
Greece and Italy, Jeffrey Siger's An Aegean April and David P. Wagner's A
Funeral in Mantova. Details on my blog, at
https://lesasbookcritiques.blogspot.com. Entries from the U.S. only, please.

-- Lesa Holstine lesa.holstine@gmail.com

Friday, April 27, 2018

SleuthSayers: Revise, Revise! by Thomas Pluck

SleuthSayers: Revise, Revise!: by Thomas Pluck Thomas Pluck Last night I attended a reading at the local Red Eye Cafe in Montclair, organized by Apryl Lee of Ha...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Trixie Belden series by Julie Campbell and “Kathry...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Trixie Belden series by Julie Campbell and “Kathry...: Reviewed by Kristin Certain books can transport me back to my childhood:   The Fire Cat by Esther Averill, The Borrowers by ...

One Bite at a Time: A Conversation With Lawrence Kelter, Editor of The...

One Bite at a Time: A Conversation With Lawrence Kelter, Editor of The...: Among the many unexpected treats I’ve had since hooking up with Down & Out Books is the opportunity to participate in anthologies. Fir...

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: A MURDER ON WALL STREET -- BY OWEN PARR

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: A MURDER ON WALL STREET -- BY OWEN PARR: MURDER ON  WALL STREET Crime Mystery Date Published: January 2017 A Joey Mancuso, Father O'Brian Crime Mystery, ...

The Graveyard Shift: FRIDAY’S HEROES: REMEMBERING THE FALLEN

The Graveyard Shift: FRIDAY’S HEROES: REMEMBERING THE FALLEN

The Writers Studio: AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT - Caroline Clemmons + Giveaway!

The Writers Studio: AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT - Caroline Clemmons + Giveaway!

Mystery Fanfare: Edgar Award Winners 2018

Mystery Fanfare: Edgar Award Winners 2018: Mystery Writers of America announced the winners for the 2018 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fictio...

Pen America: WRITERS AND ONLINE HARASSMENT: EVIDENCE OF A CHILLING EFFECT

Pen America: WRITERS AND ONLINE HARASSMENT: EVIDENCE OF A CHILLING EFFECT

FFB Review: Desert Heat, Desert Cold And Other Tales Of The West by Charlie Steel

Make sure you check out the full list at Patti's blog.

Filled with previously published tales as well as new ones Desert Heat, Desert Cold And Other Tales Of The West by Charlie Steel takes you back to the old days of the west. Before society theoretically “evolved” and decided to do better by orphan children and the down trodden. Back when it behooved the young folks to listen to the hard won wisdom of their elders who had been lucky and good enough to survive to an old age. Back when a man lived by his gun, his skills on a horse, and how well he could survive after being beaten and left for dead.

That is exactly what happens in the signature story, “Desert Heat, Desert Cold” that leads off the collection from Condor Publishing. Beaten, robbed, and left to die in the Mexican desert, the narrator must put years of wisdom passed down from Old Bill to survive.

Mike Pardee has had enough and walks out of his marriage in “Mountain Man Comes Home.” He leaves the small city of Trinidad and goes home to the mountain cabin he had before he married the town spinster. He is looking for peace.

The wagon train took the wrong path on its way to California. Now, everybody is dead except for one survivor in “Boy On The Desert.” Little Willie is by himself. Then the coyotes came to feed.

Sam Cook is a lone rancher with few plans on this Sunday in “Death Comes In The Afternoon.” A little fishing, some reading from the Bible, and a late lunch before he heads to the nearest general store for supplies. Home after the war, he is glad for every day above ground and does his best to get along with others while not surrendering his principals. No matter how pretty the Front Range is, life is never peaceful for very long.

The War Between the States just ended and it is a cold day in November in St. Louis. Young Otis Sutter is homeless, an orphan, and coming down with some sort of respiratory infection. That was before his few possessions were destroyed in “Kid On The Run.”

“The Lad From Norway” is a remarkable specimen of male vitality. How he wound up out west and very far from Norway is the point of this tale.

Winter had been brutal, but the spring meant the thaw and getting out of the cabin. It also meant a trip to town, a couple of purchases, and far too much drinking. At least when he woke up he still had his dog, Nuisance. He copes as best as he can with the aftermath in “Nuisance And The Girl.”

The old man came to town knowing his days were numbered. He has been places and done a quite a few things over the years. He has a lot of knowledge to pass on. He found a receptive audience for his memories in “Old Man In A Rocking Chair.”

Eight year old Sammy Tucker knows the town like the back of his hand. He had explored it all. He also knows everyone in town. So, he knows trouble has come calling in “Little Sammy Tucker And The Strangers.”
Author Charlie Steel

The old man has stories to share with his grandson. Life lessons he means to impart no matter what his son has to say about him. A boy needs to know the truth about life and more in “The Dust Still Rising.”

Frances Stevens did not make eighty-two years of age by being soft. “Grandma Gives No Quarter” and she isn’t about to now when the fate of those she cares about is at stake.

“Hot Desert, Hot Rock, Hot Snake” is pretty much self-explanatory. It all leads to a really bad day on the trail.

The plight of orphan children is a frequent theme in many of the stories of this collection. Such is the case in “Hard Times For Billy O’Reilly.” Being fourteen and poor is bad enough. Being beaten is worse. Then he gets thrown in the local jail before being thrown on the orphan train and shipped out of New York to be a problem for somebody else to deal with at the end of the line.

Being the youngest in the bunkhouse means the nastiest jobs fall to Leonard. He doesn’t know ranch life and yet “The Rain Pours On.” He has a plan.

Zeke and Art are old men playing checkers at their small homestead near the town of Walsenburg, Colorado. They are both cranky old guys, but they get along okay. That is until events start to happen in “Something In The Wood Pile.”

The horse is fine, but the rider hanging on the edge of the cliff is in a world of trouble. Six hundred feet below is certain death in “On The Edge.”

Bobby Carter was traveling alone when the warriors attacked. They have him pinned down in the rocks against Badito Cone. It is a matter of time before he is dead. In “Dead Man’s Song” he makes one final stand the only way he knows how.

The seventeen tales that make up Desert Heat, Desert Cold And Other Tales Of The West. Each tale is accompanied at least once and often twice with a black and white illustration of the story. The illustrations by Gail Heath are a nice touch in the book. As is the detailed “Acknowledgements” page that gives background on the various sites and publications that have published many of these tales.

Whether new for this book or previously published in print or online, all the tales in this collection share a common theme of survival and acceptance. Survival as long as one can and acceptance of when the work is done and it is time to go. Desert Heat, Desert Cold And Other Tales Of The West by Charlie Steel is a good read and worth your time.




Desert Heat, Desert Cold And Other Tales Of The West
Charlie Steel
Condor Publishing
August 2009
ISBN# 978-1-931079-06-8
Paperback (also available in eBook)
166 Pages
$12.95


Material supplied by the author with no expectation of a review.


Kevin R. Tipple ©2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018

New issue of Crime Review

We feature new 20 reviews in each issue of Crime Review (
www.crimereview.co.uk), together with a top industry interview. This time
it’s author Laura Lippman in the Countdown hot seat.

We’re on Twitter at:
Crime Review: @CrimeReviewUK
Linda Wilson: @CrimeReviewer
Sharon Wheeler: @lartonmedia

This week’s reviews are:

FIRE by LC Tyler, reviewed by John Cleal
In 1666 England is at war with Spain and France. A massive blaze destroys
much of London. Lawyer John Grey is tasked with discovering whether a
Frenchman is to blame and is plunged into danger that threatens both
himself and the nation.

KING SOLOMON’S CURSE By Andy McDermott, reviewed by Linda Wilson
Archaeologist Nina Wilde goes in search of the legendary King Solomon’s
mines, and ends up putting her young daughter at risk.

A GREAT RECKONING by Louise Penny, reviewed by Sylvia Maughan
A professor in the academy for the training of police recruits is found
murdered. The killer could be another disgruntled professor or even one of
the recruits.

EIGHTEEN BELOW by Stefan Ahnhem, reviewed by Kati Barr-Taylor
It looked like suicide when the car drove into the water. But now the
troubled Helsingborg crime squad know it is murder.

BLOODY SCOTLAND by Lin Anderson & others, reviewed by Ewa Sherman
A collection of short stories by 12 of Scotland’s best crime writers using
the country’s iconic sites and structures.

NAME OF THE DOG by Elmer Mendoza, reviewed by Chris Roberts
Detective ‘Lefty’ Mendieta is trying to get to grips with a chain of
murders of dentists when the death of someone close to a drug boss triggers
a war.

WHERE DEAD MEN MEET by Mark Mills, reviewed by Arnold Taylor
Sister Agnes of St Theresa’s orphanage comes upon an intruder in the middle
of the night. When she fails to supply information regarding one of the
children who lived there, he kills her.

I AM THUNDER by Muhammad Khan, reviewed by Linda Wilson
Fifteen-year-old Muzna wants to be a writer. Her Pakistani-born parents
want her to be a doctor. When the hottest boy in her new school starts to
pay attention to her, Muzna can’t believe her luck, but all good things
come at a price.

SECRETS IN DEATH by JD Robb, reviewed by John Barnbrook
Lieutenant Eve Dallas witnesses the murder of the glamorous, but poisonous,
journalist Larinda Mars. In order to find the killer, Dallas leads the
investigation into the web of unpleasant interactions that is Larinda’s
life.

MIDNIGHT BLUE by Simone van der Vlugt, reviewed by John Cleal
A young widow leaves her home in the Dutch polders for a life in Amsterdam.
But she must move on when the past threatens to catch up with her.

THE MISSING GIRL by Jenny Quintana, reviewed by Kati Barr-Taylor
The 30 years since Gabriella disappeared have not erased the memories, or
numbed the pain. Now her sister Anna is determined to find out what
happened.

DATE WITH MALICE by Julia Chapman, reviewed by John Cleal
When elderly Alice Shepherd tries to convince detective Samson O’Brien
someone is trying to kill her, he dismisses her fears as the ramblings of a
confused old lady. Then a series of incidents at her retirement home
launches him into a complex investigation.

PULSE by Felix Francis, reviewed by Linda Wilson
Dr Chris Rankin is used to having patients die on her but none have been as
shrouded in mystery as the man brought in unconscious after a day at
Cheltenham races. Despite warnings, she isn’t prepared to leave well alone.

OUT OF THE ICE by Ann Turner, reviewed by Chris Roberts
Environmental scientist Laura Alvarado investigates an old abandoned
Norwegian whaling station in the remote Antarctic and finds signs of recent
activity.

RED RIGHT HAND by Chris Holm, reviewed by John Cleal
When a family video captures an Islamic terror attack, it also reveals a
key organised crime witness the FBI long thought dead. Special Agent
Charlie Thompson turns to former CIA assassin Michael Hendricks for help to
trace the man they called the Red Right Hand.

TRUST ME by Zosia Wand, reviewed by Linda Wilson
It’s not like 17-year-old Sam to skip school. Lizzie, his father’s partner,
is determined to find out what is threatening the family unit she’s built
up.

GRAVESEND by William Boyle, reviewed by John Cleal
Ray Boy Calabrese is released from prison 16 years after a gay-bashing
incident led to the death of a young man. Consumed by guilt and despair, he
seeks street justice – a revenge killing from one of the dead boy’s
relatives.

MY NAME IS NATHAN LUCIUS by Mark Winkler, reviewed by Chris Roberts
Nathan Lucius sells advertising space for a Cape Town newspaper. When his
only real friend Madge asks him to kill her, Nathan is prepared to help.

PROTECTED BY THE SHADOWS by Helene Tursten, reviewed by Kati Barr-Taylor
The burnt-out body is just the beginning in this latest wave of organised
crime and Goteburg detective Irene Huss discovers her own family is caught
up in the gang chaos.

BAD GIRLS FROM HISTORY by Dee Gordon, reviewed by Kim Fleet
An anthology of prostitutes, mistresses, murderers and troublemakers.

Best wishes

Sharon
www.crimereview.co.uk

Candlelight Vigil for Officer Rogelio Santander

Candlelight Vigil for Officer Rogelio Santander


The Candlelight Vigil for our beloved Northeast Officer Rogelio Santander, #10934, will be on April 26, 2018 at the Northeast Division 9915 East Northwest Highway. 6:30pm – Doors are open 7:30pm – Start of Program Speakers 8:00pm – Lighting of Candles

Mystery Fanfare: How to Survive a Trip to the Wilderness (With or W...

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Crime Watch: Normal afternoons in Nacogdoches,Texas: an intervi...

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Story and Grit: Gravedigger Blues by Peter DiChellis

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The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 4/25/18

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 4/25/18

Only days left to win books by Avery Daniels, Gretchen Archer, Maggie Pill and more from KRL

Only days left to win a copy of "Nailed" by Avery Daniels along with a bit
about Earth Day by Avery
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/nailed-by-avery-daniels/

Only days left to win a copy of "Double Dog Dare" by Gretchen Archer &
while there check out an interesting interview with Gretchen
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/double-dog-dare-by-gretchen-archer/

Only days left to win a copy of "Date with Malice" by Julia Chapman
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/date-with-malice-by-julia-chapman/

Only days left to win a copy of "Perils, Plots, and Puppies" by Maggie Pill
along with a fun pet related post by Maggie
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/perils-plots-and-puppies-by-maggie-pill/

Only days left to win a copy of "A Hole in One" by Judy Penz Sheluk, along
with a fun mini interview with Judy about golf
http://www.krlnews.com/2018/04/a-hole-in-one-by-judy-penz-sheluk.html

Happy reading,
Lorie

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Uncommon Type, Stolen Life, Bedlam Sta...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Uncommon Type, Stolen Life, Bedlam Sta...: This week’s Nevermore opened with Uncommon Type , a collection of short stories by Tom Hanks.   Our reader quite enjoyed the book...

Writer Beware: AUTHOR COMPLAINTS MOUNT AT CURIOSITY QUILLS PRESS

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Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 34 Calls for Submissions in May 2018 - Paying Mark...

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 34 Calls for Submissions in May 2018 - Paying Mark...: Public domain image There are nearly three dozen calls for submissions in May. Every genre and form is wanted, from speculative fictio...

DPD Announcement from the Northeast Dallas Substation

As those who follow me on FB know, I shared information on this incident as it was happening yesterday. We heard the sirens and could see the news helicopters as well as the police helicopters orbit just to our west. The Home Depot, where the shooting inside the store occurred, is just down the street from Medical City Dallas Hospital. The officers involved are from the nearby police substation. Below is a message posted to our neighborhood association this morning  from the DPD Public Information Officer of that substation. 


Important Update on Northeast Dallas Police Officers

It is with great sadness that we must inform you that Dallas Police Officer Rogelio Santander of the Northeast station, #10934 passed away at 8:11 this morning from his injuries. Again, we ask that you please continue to pray for Officer Santander’s family as they try to cope with this tragic loss. Officer Crystal Almeida remains in critical condition and prayers for her recovery are still appreciated. We have been getting large requests on how to assist or donate to the families. The following foundations below and the web links will allow you to do so. The Dallas Police Department appreciates your thoughts and prayers during this time. Dallas Blue Foundation http://www.dallasbluefoundation.com/ Assist the Officer Foundation https://atodallasrelief.firstresponderprocessing.com/ Blue Guardians Foundation https://t.co/H2Eyth9zFK Fallen Officers Foundation http://www.dallasfof.org/ Officer Down Foundation https://bpadallas.org/our-foundation/about-the-odf#

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: SHAMANISM IN THE 21ST CENTURY

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Guest Post: Jeanne and Treadmill Books: No Charm Intended by Mollie Cox Bryan

Earlier this month Jeanne reviewed Behind Chocolate Bars by Kathy Aarons. Very nice to have her back on the blog today for this final Wednesday of April.

.
Treadmill Books: No Charm Intended by Mollie Cox Bryan


Cora and Jane are hosting another crafter’s weekend, expecting guests from all over to come and participate in a variety of crafts using natural materials.  A problem arises when Gracie, a local babysitter, fails to show up to take care of Jane’s daughter.  Then a strange text (“I kidnapped her”) pops up on several phones.  Gracie’s boyfriend, Paul, comes to see if Gracie is with Jane and tells the two women about a Wizard of Oz online game they have all been playing but which has generated some very odd messages.  As the police turn out to search for the missing Gracie, Cora and Jane go ahead with their programs, all the while wondering if Gracie has run away or if something more sinister has occurred.

I think this is a case of my picking up exactly the wrong book to start a series.  I’ve done it before.  Of all the Nero Wolfe books, the first one I picked up had Wolfe setting out for Montenego so of course I thought all that talk about him never leaving his house was pfui.  In this book, the second in the Cora Crafts Mysteries, things got off to a promising start but then sort of bogged down for me.  There was a good bit of backstory for our two heroines, and we were treated to lots of descriptions of what the various crafters were doing but it seemed little was done to follow any leads. After a couple of hundred pages, I was ready to throw in the towel.  I skimmed the last hundred plus which did lead to an exciting conclusion but for me it was a bit late.

I was still puzzling over why so much time was devoted to the crafters when I thought to check the author’s other series, Cumberland Creek Mysteries.  Sure enough, a few of the names seemed to match up so I suspect regular readers were delighted to catch up with old friends while I was simply baffled.

Another problem might have been that I know of the Wizard of Oz park which plays a role in the book.  I haven’t been myself but a friend has been several times to the fall events and loved it.  I was expecting the park to figure more throughout the book and was disappointed when it didn’t.

Jane and Cora were well developed as characters, women who have been tested by life.  They are damaged but strong-willed, brave, and intelligent. They respected law enforcement and trusted the police to follow through in their investigations, something fictional sleuths rarely do but which made for a nice change. The crafts were interesting and inventive, with bits of information on using natural materials (how to prepare native clay, for example) which normally I would have enjoyed so I am a bit perplexed as to why this book didn’t wow me.

It’s entirely possible I just started with the wrong book.  Of course, the fact that it was pouring rain outside, meaning I had 12,000 steps to walk on the treadmill, may also have been a factor.  But for whatever reason, this book just didn’t hold my attention.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Monday, April 23, 2018

April 21 Issue of RTE

The April 21 issue of RTE is out and includes fifteen new reviews as well as a new interview:

http://www.reviewingtheevidence.com                   

Maris Soule is in the 'Sixty seconds with . . .' interview hot seat:                             
http://www.reviewingtheevidence.com/interviews.html?id=253


                               
REVIEWS THIS WEEK:

GREEKS BEARING GIFTS    Philip Kerr     Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

THE PUNISHMENT SHE DESERVES    Elizabeth George     Reviewed by Phyllis Onstad

TWO KINDS OF TRUTH    Michael Connelly    Reviewed by Jim Napier   
CAVE OF BONES    Anne Hillerman    Reviewed by Sharon Mensing   
NIGHT MOVES     Jonathan Kellerman        Reviewed by Caryn St Clair

THE STORM KING    Brendan Duffy    Reviewed by Cathy Downs   
COBRA CLUTCH    A.L. Devlin    Reviewed by Susan Hoover   
RAINBIRDS    Clarissa Goenawan     Reviewed by Lourdes Venard

WEEPING WATERS     Karin Brynard    Reviewed by Anne Corey    
IN STRANGERS' HOUSES    Elizabeth Mundy     Reviewed by Larissa Kyzer

A BREATH AFTER DROWNING         Alice Blanchard    Reviewed by Cathy Downs

THE FLEUR de SEL MURDERS    Jean-Luc Bannalec     Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

NUMBER 7, RUE  JACOB    Wendy Hornsby     Reviewed by Ruth Castleberry

LOST BOOKS AND OLD BONES    Paige Shelton    Reviewed by Sharon Mensing

THE GHOST IN ROOMETTE FOUR    Janet Dawson     Reviewed by Lourdes Venard           
We post more than 900 new reviews a year -- all of them are archived on the site -- as well as a new interview with a top author every issue.

Yvonne Klein
Editor: ymk@reviewingtheevidence.com

Michael Pool: Two Steps From Success: Dispatches From a Debut Book Tour

Michael Pool: Two Steps From Success: Dispatches From a Debut Book Tour

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 38

Unlawful Acts: Incident Report No. 38

TOUGH: Itsy Bitsy Spider, by Michael Bracken

TOUGH: Itsy Bitsy Spider, by Michael Bracken: I recognized Millie’s work when I saw the tattooed spider web that radiated out from Mona’s quarter-sized areola and covered her entire le...

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: TIL DEATH DO US PARTY

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: TIL DEATH DO US PARTY: Til Death Do Us Party A Liv and Di in Dixie Mystery #4 by Vickie Fee Genre: Cozy Mystery Las Vegas knows how to pa...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: A Tale of Two Kitties by Sofie Kelly

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: A Tale of Two Kitties by Sofie Kelly: Reviewed by Jeanne Librarian Kathleen Paulson has found a real home in Mayville Heights, Minnesota. She has a loving boyfriend, ...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: TEXAS LITERARY CALENDAR April 23-2...

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In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday for 4/23/18

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Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: Dead Cold by Claire Stibbe

Dead Cold  by Claire Stibbe (Noble Lizard Publishing, 2017) is the fourth book in her police procedural series about Albuquerque Police Detective David Temeke and his partner Malin Santiago. Temeke is called out in the middle of the night for a house explosion and fire with fatalities. Of the residents, it appears Flynn McCann escaped with smoke inhalation, burns, and a concussion while his wife Tarian perished. The reek of gasoline and the pattern of the blaze scream arson, so both the fire and police departments begin investigative measures without delay. Flynn claims not to remember what happened in the hours leading up to the explosion. The neighbors report frequent loud altercations between the couple, and a cryptic poem is found hand-delivered in their mail box. Temeke’s check of the garage shows a chair with leather cuffs on the legs and arms with what might be bloodstains and a Barbie doll on a shelf nearby, adding to the list of questions about this household.

Once the autopsy reveals that Tarian was dead before the fire started and the police learn Tarian filed a restraining order against her husband just months before, Flynn knows he is considered a person of interest in his wife’s death and he decides to leave the state before he can be arrested. He travels to Gallup in search of his birth father, whom he does not remember. The text alternates between Flynn’s tour of the Southwest along the legendary Route 66 and the police investigation that steadily uncovers marital infidelity, drug addiction, and financial instability.

The interaction and natural personality conflicts among the police personnel provide a counterpoint to the tension of the unfolding plot. Just how Temeke, a black London native, ended up in Albuquerque isn’t clear nor is how he’s managed to get crosswise with some senior police officials. A bit more back story would be helpful. 

The narrative of the scenery of New Mexico and Arizona is picturesque and makes the book worth reading all by itself.

Stibbe is the winner of the 2017 New Mexico/Arizona Book Award.





·         Paperback: 346 pages
·         Publisher: Noble Lizard Publishing (October 31, 2017)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 0998202703
·         ISBN-13: 978-0998202709


Aubrey Hamilton ©2018

Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal IT projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Davy Crockett's Almanack of Mystery, Adventure and The Wild West: STEPHEN MERTZ returns to detective fiction with SA...

Davy Crockett's Almanack of Mystery, Adventure and The Wild West: STEPHEN MERTZ returns to detective fiction with SA...: Steve Mertz’s first book, way back in 1979, was a detective novel called Some Die Hard (reviewed HERE ). Since then, over the course o...

David Gaughran: Giving A Voice To Indies

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Bookblog of the Bristol Library: The Almost Sisters by Joshilyn Jackson

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Amazing Stories: “LOST IN TIME, LOST IN SPACE…and MEANING” by Steve Fahnestalk

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Lesa's Book Critiques: Sunday Reading Corner & Promises, Promises

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Saturday, April 21, 2018

Grandson Picture

Justin and Mom are doing very well and now home. Below is another picture from earlier hours in the hospital.




Gravetapping: SLAMMER by Allan Guthrie

Gravetapping: SLAMMER by Allan Guthrie: Nick Glass is a rookie guard in a Scottish prison. He’s been on the job six weeks with bad results. The other guards make trouble for hi...

KRL This week Update for 4/21/18

Up in KRL this morning a review & giveaway of "Nailed" by Avery Daniels
along with a bit about Earth Day by Avery
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/nailed-by-avery-daniels/



And a review & signed giveaway of "Double Dog Dare" by Gretchen Archer
along with an interesting interview with Gretchen
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/double-dog-dare-by-gretchen-archer/



We also have a review & giveaway of "Date with Malice" by Julia Chapman
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/date-with-malice-by-julia-chapman/



And a review & giveaway of "Perils, Plots, and Puppies" by Maggie Pill
along with a fun pet related post by Maggie
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/perils-plots-and-puppies-by-maggie-pill/



And a flash mystery short story by Maggie-beth Rees
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/one-fine-day-mystery-short-story/



And an article about Alan Bradley's Flavia de Luce mysteries
http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/alan-bradleys-flavia-de-luce/



For those who also enjoy fantasy, a review & giveaway of "Lake Silence" by Anne
Bishop http://kingsriverlife.com/04/21/lake-silence-by-anne-bishop/



Up on KRL News & Reviews we have a review & giveaway of "A Hole in One" by Judy
Penz Sheluk, along with a fun mini interview with Judy about golf
http://www.krlnews.com/2018/04/a-hole-in-one-by-judy-penz-sheluk.html
Happy Reading,
Lorie

Mystery Fanfare: EARTH DAY CRIME FICTION: Environmental Mysteries

Mystery Fanfare: EARTH DAY CRIME FICTION: Environmental Mysteries: Earth Day 2018 Earth Day! Today the world considers climate change, environmental issues, and how we can save our planet. At least I ...

Friday, April 20, 2018

Email Is Out

My email remains offline and not working as it has since 1 PM today. If you are awaiting a response from me, please be patient as this problem--like pretty much everything else in my life--- is beyond my control.

FFB Review: Coffin Corner by Dell Shannon

It is Friday and that means it is time for storms and rains here in North Texas with yet another severe weather watch later today. It also means it is time for Friday’s Forgotten Books hosted by Patti Abbott. We have a real treat here on the blog today as Aubrey Hamilton offers us her review of the 1966 book, Coffin Corner by Dell Shannon. Amazon does not list the month of publication. Depending on when it came out in the year, I was most likely 4 years old. Suffice it to say, I was not reading much back then and have not read this one. Be sure to check out the other reading suggestions for today over at Patti’s blog.


Dell Shannon was one of the pen names used by Elizabeth Linington to turn out an impressive list of police procedurals between 1960 and 1988. Set in southern California, they documented galloping societal changes and showcased her own conservative political leanings while portraying a Homicide team juggling multiple investigations.

Coffin Corner (William Morrow, 1966) is the 11th book featuring Lt. Luis Mendoza and his group of detectives in which they learn a suicide isn’t what it appears to be and neither is the heart attack of a thrift store owner. Officers sent to notify her family that Eliza McCann died in her store find an eccentric group living in a run-down hotel in an old section of Los Angeles. An undertaker with no customers, a convicted felon, a confused lady awaiting the return of her fiancĂ© from World War I, a would-be opera singer, an astrologer, and similar offbeat individuals have drifted to the tired old building because of its low cost and lack of judgment from other residents. Their oddities are no more than a conversational tidbit among the detectives until the autopsy reveals Eliza was poisoned. Then the question of just how strange these people really are becomes serious police business.

Linington must have had a good time writing this story, the characters are entertainingly bizarre and the plot stops just this side of over the top. It’s hard not to think The Addams Family television show, which premiered two years before this book was released, inspired her. Linington sketched breathing characters in a few words and her plots were inventive. Her meshing of the personal lives of her detectives with their professional lives was a pleasure to read. I always loved her books and they were on my must-buy list as long as they were published. I find though their descriptions of life in southern California in the 1960s and 1970s were just a little too faithful and they didn’t wear well with time. Her practice of talking about how much everything costs profoundly dates the books and the casual racism is jarring. And with all of the scandals of the past 25 years, it’s hard to see any police force as unreservedly wonderful as they are portrayed here. Still, she wrote fine detective stories and Linington was on top of her game with this one.




Aubrey Hamilton ©2018

Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal IT projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

A New Tipple Has Arrived

I am a grandfather for the second time as Karl's wife, Amy, gave birth to her second child this afternoon. A little over six pounds, Justin entered the world at 2:22 PM today. Baby and Mom are doing well.


DMN: 'I like writing about people who are evil, but they have good reason to be evil:' Walter Mosley heads to Dallas

DMN:  'I like writing about people who are evil, but they have good reason to be evil:' Walter Mosley heads to Dallas

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: NEW RELEASE PLUS AN AMAZON SALE FOR YOU!

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Do Some Damage: The Return of No One Wants To Read Your Book

Do Some Damage: The Return of No One Wants To Read Your Book: By David Nemeth Last month I wrote a post here called " No One Wants to Read Your Book " and today is a variation of that th...

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 4/18/18

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Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: River Town, Girl on the Velvet Swing, N...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: River Town, Girl on the Velvet Swing, N...: Reported by Ambrea Nevermore started with River Town:   Two Years on the Yangtze by Peter Hessler, the first in a trilogy of...

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Theft and the Prophecy: Two Fictional Impossib...

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The Rap Sheet: Just a Few Things to Mention

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In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 4/18/18

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Review: August Snow by Stephen Mack Jones

With twelve million dollars in the bank and after a year sabbatical overseas, August Snow has  returned home to the house he grew up in the “Mexicantown” area of Detroit Michigan. The old neighborhood, much like the rest of Detroit, has taken a beating and is struggling to survive. August Snow has do ne his part by putting some of the money he won from the city after his wrongful termination from the police force into his house as well as some of the neighboring houses. The son of an African-American father and a Mexican- American mother, August Snow is trying to rebuild his life and finally come to terms with his past.

While August Snow is back and very quietly minding his own business, some welcome his presence and many others do not. One of those that welcomes August Snow back is Captain Ray Danbury of the Detroit Police Department. One of a very few friends on the force, Danbury is acting as a messenger for a wealthy widow by the name of Eleanore Paget.

Eleanore Paget wants August Snow and reached out to her numerous contacts to spread the word. She has been difficult in the way only the rich can. It isn’t long before August Snow is out at her expansive estate at Grose Point. It isn’t the first time he has been at her home and that ties into the reason she wants him now.

Owner of a private wealth management and investment bank, Titan Investment Securities Group which dates back to the late 1800s where her great great grandfather started it, she is sure something is wrong. She can’t provide actual details other than a sense she is being frozen out by the CEO, the board, and other parties. Even though August Snow is not licensed as a private investigator, she wants his help and is not pleased when she does not instantly get it. While he can look at a few things for her, there is not much he can do.

Within hours she is dead and her name is added to the long list of regrets in the life of August Snow. He also knows that her death certainly was not a suicide. He begins to investigate and soon enters into a modern day war zone hotter than anything he saw in combat overseas.

August Snow by Stephen Mack Jones is an incredible read. Much like Down The River Unto The Sea by Walter Mosley, inherent racism is a dominating character at work throughout the book as is the consequences of serving on a police force and the loss of a career and that legacy. At the same time in August Snow the power of wealth and what it can do for good and evil is also a major point of the book.

At it is heart, the book is part thriller, part mystery, and part crime fiction. The ratios of those parts change a bit from page to page and chapter to chapter as author Stephen Mack Jones crafts a read that is very hard to put down. The result is an often intense read that blends in relevant social commentary while not slowing down a bit.

Simply put, August Snow, by Stephen Mack Jones, is one amazing read and highly recommended.

I had never heard of this book until I recently read an excellent review of it by David Nemeth. You should read his review and check out his other offerings at his Unlawful Acts website.



August Snow
Stephen Mack Jones
Soho Press
ISBN# 978-1-61695-718-6
February 2017
Hardback (also available in eBook, paperback, and audio formats)
320 Pages
$25.95



Copy provided by the good folks of the Lochwood Branch of the Dallas Public Library.



Kevin R. Tipple ©2018