Friday, September 20, 2019

Lesa's Book Critiques: Book Giveaway - A Couple Lighter Mysteries

Lesa's Book Critiques: Book Giveaway - A Couple Lighter Mysteries

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Living with Air Plants

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Living with Air Plants: Once again, we welcome back Kevin Tipple with a review.  Catch up with more reviews, book news, and interesting links at his blog, Kev...

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: BOOK CLUBS!

A Writer's Life....Caroline Clemmons: BOOK CLUBS!: by Bea Tifton Do you belong to a book club? I actually belong to two of them, both very different. My first ever book club was more ab...

FFB Review: Parker Field: A Willie Black Mystery by Howard Owen

For the full list of reading suggestions for this Friday in September 2019, head over to Todd Mason's Sweet Freedom Blog.


The third in the series, Parker Field: A Willie Black Mystery begins in April and with a gunshot. The weather cuts like a knife and feels more like the middle of March so nobody really should have been sitting on a bench in Monroe Park. Yet, somebody was out there and was shot. That park is just across the street from Willie’s apartment building. As he is the reporter for the crime beat, one of his several bosses at the paper sends him over to cover the story.

It isn’t until he is on scene and sees the victim that Willie realizes the man that was shot is Les Hacker. For all intents and purposes, the man is his father as he has had such a huge presence and role in his life in recent years. Not that they are related by blood, they are still family and he has been the best thing to ever happen to Willie’s mom, Peggy. Les Hacker has no enemies and yet somebody has deliberately shot him.

Answering the question as to who shot him and why seems to be a police matter so Willie is more than content to let them figure out the case as he spends time at the hospital. As many contacts and family friends begin to show up at the hospital, one is Jimmy Deacon, better known to all as “Jumpin’ Jimmy.” A man of nervous energy with a nearly constant ability to speak in the third person about himself, the man is intense. He is also a reservoir of knowledge regarding minor league baseball in Richmond, Virginia, and the surrounding areas. So, he knows a considerable amount of history regarding the last team Les Hacker played for, the 1964 Richmond Vees.

As Jumpin’ Jimmy explains it, Les Hacker isn’t the only one on the team to be shot. Fellow players Lucky Whitestone and Phil Holt were both victims of gun violence as well in recent years. They are not the only players who are dead before their time either.

The more he learns from Les when he is awake enough to talk and from Jumpin’ Jimmy, the more it seems that the shooting has to be connected in some way to that 1964 team. Many of whom who have died in the years since and often in violent ways long before their age and health issues would have naturally struck them down. Pitching the story to the newspaper bosses as a follow-up to the members if the 1964 team—a where are they now type piece--- gets Willie the freedom to chase leads as he starts trying to identify the motive of the shooter as well as that person’s identity. Hopefully, chasing the story won’t get Willie Black killed.

Third in the series behind Oregon Hill and The Philadelphia Quarry, Parker Field: A Willie Black Mystery is another very good read. All the established characters make return appearances. Some of those appearances result in discussions of past events. Plenty of mystery and the frequent flashes of sarcastic humor prevalent in the previous books are also present here. Parker Field: A Willie Black Mystery is another very good read in a series that should be read in order. 


Parker Field: A Willie Black Mystery
Howard Owen
The Permanent Press
July 2014
ISBN# 978-1-57962-361-6
Hardback (also available in audio and digital formats)
224 Pages

Material supplied by the White Rock Hills Branch of the Dallas Public Library System.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2019

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Would You Like To Be My Neighbor?

Picture from the CB DALLAS website

I miss a lot of stuff in Plano, but I don't miss the insane rent and fees paid to American Community Properties or the fact that we always had to wait a month or longer to get something in the apartment fixed. The market in the neighborhood has turned down rental price wise or we would have been here back when my Mom was alive and I was desperately trying to get us as close as possible to help her. After trying to raise the rent on our former neighbors, the family moved, and the house next door that has been vacant for a month is now back on the market. All the details are here.

Health Warning


Market Call: Heartbreaks & Half-Truths: 21 Stories of Mystery & Suspense (Superior Shores Press)

Market Call: Heartbreaks & Half-Truths: 21 Stories of Mystery & Suspense (Superior Shores Press)

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Ain't No Grave: The Life and Legacy of Brother Cl...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Ain't No Grave: The Life and Legacy of Brother Cl...:  Reviewed by Jeanne A young man from Maryville, Tennessee was browsing a record store in London, England when he realized that the ...

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: Top 12 Paying Markets for Fiction, Personal Essays...

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: Top 12 Paying Markets for Fiction, Personal Essays...: Mr B finds Pamela writing (Wikimedia Commons) Here are a dozen prestigious literary magazines that accept submissions of poetry, short...

Bitter Tea and Mystery Review: More Work for the Undertaker: Margery Allingham

Bitter Tea and Mystery: More Work for the Undertaker: Margery Allingham: I have talked here about how much I like Margery Allingham's Albert Campion series. Since I started blogging, I have reread and reviewed...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Review: TO SQUEEZE A PRAIRIE DOG

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Review: TO SQUEEZE A PRAIRIE DOG: I reviewed To Squeeze a Prairie Dog: An American Novel (Mutt Press) by Austin's Scott Semegran for Lone Star Literary Life. Semegran ...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Jackson, Choo, Greene, Streever, McCrum...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Jackson, Choo, Greene, Streever, McCrum...: Reported by Laura             Nevermore read a wide variety of books this week from suspense to heartwarming to intriguing non...

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Lesa's Book Critiques: Small Kingdoms & Other Stories by Charlaine Harris

Lesa's Book Critiques: Small Kingdoms & Other Stories by Charlaine Harris

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 9/18/19

In  Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 9/18/19

SleuthSayers: Pithy and Thought-Provoking...or Not by Michael Bracken

SleuthSayers: Pithy and Thought-Provoking...or Not: by Michael Bracken I’ve been so busy the past month that I’ve not had time to draft something pithy and thought-provoking. In August, I ...

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Tormented Bookshop: "The Case of the Murder on...

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Tormented Bookshop: "The Case of the Murder on...: Hirai Tarō is the father of the Japanese detective story and choose as his nom-de-plume a phonetic rendering of the name of the progenitor ...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Man of Constant Sorrow: My Life and Times by Dr. R...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Man of Constant Sorrow: My Life and Times by Dr. R...: In honor of Rhythm and Roots, we are re-posting a review by Jeanne first run in February, 2010.   This region has long been known for...

Review: Judge Thee Not by Edith Maxwell

Review: Judge Thee Not by Edith Maxwell

Review: Mystery Weekly Magazine: June 2019


Mystery Weekly Magazine: June 2019 opens with the cover story of “Squeezer and Bongo” by Terrie Farley Moran. Mr. Bongorelli, a corporate attorney, is less than thrilled when Squeezer Markhum shows up at his office.  They both are a long ways from High School and for Bongo a lot of those memories are not necessarily positive. While Bongorelli, aka “Bongo” does corporate law these days, Squeezer works as a garbage man. Squeezer wants and insists on Bongo’s help as he is in real trouble with the cops. That very morning Squeezer and his partner, Mikey, found the body of Squeezer’s ex-wife, Lisa Gasper, placed in a chair outside a derelict Victorian on their pickup route. With the chair as well as the body covered by a sheet they had no idea what they had until they had stopped and pulled the sheet off the chair. Obviously, Squeezer is the obvious suspect. The last thing Bongo wants to do is help Squeezer. Yet, he keeps getting pulled in deeper and deeper as things become increasingly complicated in this very good tale.

Evan showed up at Randy’s place in “The Calm” by Ken Hueler and nobody was home. He drove away and tried to stay awake as he pondered where to go next. That was before he saw her on the other side of the road. She is a hitchhiker, dressed for the heat of summer, and all alone on the rapidly darkening and otherwise empty highway. He does the gentlemanly thing and offers her a ride. That may turn out to be yet another serious mistake he has made in his life.

“Interdiction” by Michael A. Clark follows where Justine is creating a trail so that no one goes after her husband. Her diversion tactic is designed so that her husband can make his escape with their money. They will rendezvous somewhere a half a world away. All the watcher is supposed to do is watch and report. Things are going smoothly until they are not and it is a good thing the watcher has a support team.

Pleasant Lane is a street of many houses in the typical suburban neighborhood where things are so tranquil people can leave their front doors unlocked and live life in a sort of Norman Rockwall fantasy life deal. Gladys Farrow is the neighborhood snoop in “The Other Woman” by Michael Thomas Smith. She knows damn near everything about everyone on her street and her friend Betty does not approve. Undeterred by the criticism, Gladys wants to know more about what has been going on at the Peterson house as there has been a strange red car that keeps showing up there around dusk for an hour or so before leaving. The gorgeous woman driving the car is certainly not Mrs. Peterson. The game is a foot and Gladys is determined to learn the identity of the mystery woman and more.

It began in Russia in 1979 and has tentacles that reach into today in “Russian Dolls” by Eliot Hudson. Anatoly Moskvin was nine then and all alone in the playground when the men came and made him go to a cemetery with them. What happened that day has become his life’s work and obsession. You can’t judge until you know all the fact of this dark and twisted tale.

“Buick” by Bob Tippee features a car that has been well taken care off by Seth Townes before being passed on to this son, Ralph. At first, seventeen year old Ralph is not exactly thrilled with the Buick LaCrosse. As he thinks about it more, he realizes the potential of the spacious backseat. A backseat that makes Sienna very comfortable and willing when the mood strikes them. It does frequently and on one such occasion makes them the target for auto theft.

The plan had been to try to get the mayor’s support for the Waterview Housing Co-Op. He would come out and take a tour and shake a few hands. If things went right, he would publicly support the building as part of a push for affordable housing. Now the mayor, Fred Drover, is dead in “A Locked Co-Op Mystery” by Merrilee Robson and all heck is going to break loose.

The issue closes with the solution to the “You-Solve It” in the May 2019 issue titled “For the love of wine” by Tatiana Claudy.

Mystery Weekly Magazine: June 2019 is another solidly good issue. Mystery, as it has been since the start, is defined widely in this publication. Mystery Weekly Magazine is not a niche magazine catering to only a small part of the mystery community. This issue, as do the previous issues, features a mix of storytelling styles, crimes, and well developed characters in tales that are sure to appeal to just about any reader.


Mystery Weekly Magazine: June 2019
May 31, 2019
ASIN: B07SMWY1M9
eBook (also available in print)
122 Pages
$3.99


For quite some time now I have been gifted a subscription by the publisher with no expectation at all of a review. I read and review each issue as I can. To date, I have never submitted anything to this market and will not do so as long as I review the publication.

Kevin R. Tipple ©2019

Monday, September 16, 2019

Today's Mail Call

Big time thank you to Graham Powell for sending two new books my way.




In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 9/16/19

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 9/16/19

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Summer of ‘69 By Elin Hilderbrand

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Summer of ‘69 By Elin Hilderbrand: This week we are pleased to welcome Laura as a reviewer!  Laura has just joined the Reference Department and is an avid reader.  She especi...

Beneath the Stains of Time: Beware of the Dog: Case Closed, vol. 70 by Gosho A...

Beneath the Stains of Time: Beware of the Dog: Case Closed, vol. 70 by Gosho A...: The 70th volume of Gosho Aoyama 's Case Closed , originally titled Detective Conan in Japan, is composed of two grand stories, invol...

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 9/16/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 9/16/19

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar September ...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar September ...: Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of September 16-22, 2019 compiled exclusively for  Lone Star Literary Life  by Texas Book Lover. ...

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: Dark Tiger by William Tapply


Before Victoria Houston wrote about fly-fishing in fictional Loon Lake, Wisconsin, and Keith McCafferty gave us Sean Stranahan, a fly fisherman and private investigator in Montana, Philip Craig created J.W. Jackson, a retired policeman eking out a living via fishing and odd jobs on Martha’s Vineyard, and William Tapply invented Brady Coyne, a lawyer in Boston who practiced just enough law to pay for his fishing trips. Tapply was also a committed fisherman in his real life, publishing some 15 books about the sport and serving as a contributing editor for Field and Stream and a special correspondent for American Angler.

Tapply let his love of fishing spill over into his mystery writing even further when he began a new series featuring Stoney Calhoun, a fisherman and part-owner of a fishing supply store in upstate Maine. Stoney’s past is foggy; his memories do not go back further than waking up in a VA hospital and being told he had been struck by lightning. He moved north to start all over again in the fishing country of Maine. Every so often an unidentified man shows up, clearly from Stoney’s forgotten past, to see if Stoney has remembered anything. He doesn’t say why he wants to know, and Stoney doesn’t like it at all. However, the man has the power to make Stoney’s life uncomfortable and he demonstrates that power now and again, such as in Dark Tiger (Minotaur, 2009), when the mystery man arranges to sell the bait-and-tackle shop out from under Stoney and his partner if Stoney does not agree to investigate the very odd death of an intelligence agent.

The agent had been staying at an exclusive fishing resort on the northern edge of Maine, close to the Canadian border, so Stoney becomes a temporary fishing guide there. Within 24 hours one of the guides is shot to death and another one is arrested for the killing. Stoney feels certain the second death is connected to the dead agent and looks for ways to investigate both without blowing his cover while he fishes and admires the scenic lakes in the area.

Tapply’s books are a pleasure to read. His prose is crisp and clear, his plots are convincing, the pacing never drags. The Stoney Calhoun series will be of interest to C.J. Box and Nevada Barr fans as well as those readers who follow Victoria Houston and Keith McCafferty or anyone who wants mysteries mixed with nature.




·         Hardcover: 288 pages
·         Publisher: Minotaur Books; First Edition (September 29, 2009)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 0312379781
·         ISBN-13: 978-0312379780


Aubrey Hamilton ©2019

Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal It projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Still An Amazon Associate


Been awhile since I mentioned this, but I am still an Amazon Associate. So, every time you click through one of my links and buy something, I get a few cents added to my account. I used to use those small funds to buy some medical stuff I need and the occasional book.

By buying through one of my links, it does not cost you one cent extra. I just get a few cents my way as a referral fee. So, if you are inclined, please keep doing what you have been doing and buy through my links. It was and still is very much appreciated.

Thank you.

Lesa's Book Critiques: Remembering the Dead by Elizabeth J. Duncan

Lesa's Book Critiques: Remembering the Dead by Elizabeth J. Duncan

Saturday, September 14, 2019

Lesa's Book Critiques: The Good Cop by Peter Steiner

Lesa's Book Critiques: The Good Cop by Peter Steiner

KRL Update: Kings River Life Magazine for 9/14/19

Up on KRL this morning a review and giveaway of "Assailants, Asphalt and Alibis" by Tonya Kappes


And a review and giveaway of "The Garden Club Murder" by Amy Patricia Meade


Also reviews of the first 2 Chiara Corelli Mysteries by Catherine Maiorisi and a chance to win a copy of one of them-winner's choice


And a review of the new season of Veronica Mars up on Hulu


And a never before published mystery short story by Gary R. Hoffman


For those who prefer to listen to Mysteryrat's Maze Podcast directly on KRL the player is up here for the new episode which features the first chapter of "Spirit Wind" by Marilyn Meredith read by local actor Julia Reimer


Up on KRL News and Reviews this week a review and ebook giveaway of "Bark If It's Murder" by VM Burns


And a review and giveaway of "No More Time" by Suzanne Trauth


And a review and giveaway of "The Body in Griffith Park" by Jennifer Kincheloe

Happy reading,

Lorie

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 9/14/19

The Rap Sheet: Revue of Reviewers for 9/14/19

Slate: Why Angry Librarians Are Going to War With Publishers Over E-Books

Slate: Why Angry Librarians Are Going to War With Publishers Over E-Books

Crime Watch: Then and now: tales of troubled youth win Ngaio Ma...

Crime Watch: Then and now: tales of troubled youth win Ngaio Ma...: A trio of fresh crime voices were the culprits in Christchurch on Saturday evening as Dame Fiona Kidman, JP Pomare, and Kelly Denne...

Sweet Freedom: FRIDAY'S "FORGOTTEN" BOOKS AND MORE: the links to ...

Sweet Freedom: FRIDAY'S "FORGOTTEN" BOOKS AND MORE: the links to ...: This week's books and more, unfairly (or sometimes fairly) neglected, or simply those the reviewers below think you might find of some ...

Scott's Take: Captain America: Winter In America Volume 1


Captain America: Winter In America Volume 1 by author Ta-Nehisi Coates with art by Leinil Francis Yu is very typical of the work by Mr. Coates as it is a very political story. In this story, the real Captain America has returned after being replaced by an evil doppelganger that used his face and the people’s trust to overthrow the American Government and betray the superhero community. While the real Captain America was successful in his quest to overthrow and remove his evil doppelganger from Hydra and regain the trust of the superhero community, the people and the American Government no longer trust him. The country has fundamentally changed thanks to the Hydra takeover and the real Captain America no longer recognizes his country thanks to the changes that have come to pass. As is Bucky, Black Panther, and Sharon Carter, Captain America is also trying to find his place in the new America.

He is facing new enemies from his past that have ties to his old lesser known enemies suck as Taskmaster and others. Someone had managed to turn prisoners of war into Nukes (America Super Soldiers that use a template of failed attempt--the original Nuke-- to replicate Captain America) and is using them to attack the American people. Captain America may not recognize himself anymore or his country or the people, but he remains true to his driving core principal. If there are bad men hurting people, Captain America is going to take them on no matter what anyone else, including his own government says or wants him to do.  

The art in Captain America: Winter In America Volume 1 is great and the story itself is very interesting. There are some twists toward the end of the issue that makes the reader very interested to see where this story is headed. The story plays heavily into Captain America’s past while still being new reader friendly. Captain America has to use his brains, his leadership skills, and get help from his friends help to win the day though it does seem possible that his action may be exactly what his enemies want to finally destroy him and everything he holds dear.

If you would like a good place to start reading Captain America stuff, Captain America: Winter In America Volume 1, is a good place as long as you do not mind very political stories. I highly recommend this volume highly. Readers are cautioned that this is tale has very strong political elements and tone and therefore may offend some readers.


Captain America: Winter In America Volume 1
Writer: Ta-Nehisi Coates
Artwork: Leinil Francis Yu
Marvel Comics
March 2019
ISBN #978-1-302-91194-2
Paperback (also available in digital format)
152 Pages
$17.99


My copy came from the Arcadia Park Branch of the Dallas Public Library System.

Scott A. Tipple ©2019

Friday, September 13, 2019

Lesa's Book Critiques: Psychological Thriller Giveaway

Lesa's Book Critiques: Psychological Thriller Giveaway

Writer Beware: AUTHORS' CONCERN GROWS OVER LATE ROYALTY PAYMENTS AT DREAMSPINNER PRESS

Writer Beware: AUTHORS' CONCERN GROWS OVER LATE ROYALTY PAYMENTS AT DREAMSPINNER PRESS

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 9/11/19

In Reference To Murder: Mystery Melange for 9/11/19

Amazing Stories: NO CLOWNING AROUND: Revisiting IT (1990)! by Steve Fahnestalk

Amazing Stories: NO CLOWNING AROUND: Revisiting IT (1990)! by Steve Fahnestalk 

The Rap Sheet: Bullet Points: On Heavy Meds Edition for 9/12/19

The Rap Sheet: Bullet Points: On Heavy Meds Edition for 9/12/19

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: The Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: The Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker: Reviewed by Kristin Santa Lora is a quiet little college town tucked up in the mountains of Southern California. Most of the tow...

No FFB Today

I have been ill all week as the mastoiditis which put me in the hospital a couple of months ago has been trying to do it again. So far, I have not had the extreme dizziness and have been able to treat it well enough with over the counter stuff to be able to stay home and in bed. The blog will continue to be a bit erratic as posting depeends on how I feel.

Thursday, September 12, 2019

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Gold Watch (2019) by Paul Halter

Beneath the Stains of Time: The Gold Watch (2019) by Paul Halter: La montre en or ( The Gold Watch , 2019) is the latest mystery novel by that fabricator of miracles, Paul Halter , which is a unique tit...

Bitter Tea and Mystery Review: Champagne for One by Rex Stout

Bitter Tea and Mystery: Champagne for One: Rex Stout: In August, I reread one of my favorite books by Rex Stout, Champagne for One . It  is part of the Nero Wolfe series, of course, An acquain...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Peach Keeper, Florence of Arabia, Overs...

Bookblog of the Bristol Library: Nevermore: Peach Keeper, Florence of Arabia, Overs...: Reported by Kristin The Peach Keeper by Sarah Addison Allen provided a much-needed light, summery read for one of our Nevermore r...

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

KRL Update: Only Days Left To Win Books

Only days left to win a copy of "Death in a Budapest Butterfly" by Julia Buckley and while there check out an interesting guest post by Julia

And to win a copy of "Clause and Effect" by Kaitlyn Dunnett

Also to win an ebook copy of "A Fool's Journey" by Judy Penz Sheluk

And to win an ebook copy of "Fatal Break" by Beth Prentice, and while there check out an interesting interview with Beth

And don't forget to check out our new podcast episode that went up yesterday. This one features the first chapter of "Spirit Wind" by Marilyn Meredith read by local actor Julia Reimer

Happy reading and listening!

Lorie

--
KRL is now selling advertising & we have special discounts for mystery authors & bookstores! Ask me about it!
Mystery section in Kings River Life http://KingsRiverLife.com
Check out my own blog http://mysteryratscloset.blogspot.com

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 16 Speculative Fiction Magazines Accepting Submiss...

Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity: 16 Speculative Fiction Magazines Accepting Submiss...: Goodfreephotos.com Speculative fiction is near and dear to my heart. It's also what I write, so I am always on the lookout for spec...

Monday, September 09, 2019

Lesa's Book Critiques: Ice Cold Heart by P.J. Tracy

Lesa's Book Critiques: Ice Cold Heart by P.J. Tracy

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 9/9/19

In Reference To Murder: Media Murder for Monday 9/9/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 9/9/19

Monday Markets and Jobs for Writers for 9/9/19

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar September ...

TEXAS BOOK LOVER: Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar September ...: Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of September 9-15, 2019 compiled exclusively for  Lone Star Literary Life  by Texas Book Lover.  ...

Aubrey Hamilton Reviews: Dead Anyway by Chris Knopf


Dead Anyway by Chris Knopf (The Permanent Press, 2012) is the first book about Arthur Cathcart, a mathematics whiz who earns his living conducting mostly market research but nearly any kind of research his clients might want. His wife Florencia owns a successful insurance company. They are happily married and well off. All is right in Arthur’s world, until the day a man shows up in their living room, holding a gun on Florencia until she completes the answers to five questions written on a piece of paper. When she takes too long, he shoots Arthur in the leg and then threatens to shoot him again. After Florencia scribbles the answers down, the goon shoots her in the head and then shoots Arthur.
While Florencia died instantly, the bullet took a more indirect path through Arthur’s skull and he survives after months-long coma. He convinces his doctor sister to write a death certificate for him, since his ability to identify the murderer places him in continued jeopardy. Then he cashes out his retirement funds with his sister’s help and buys a collection of vintage guitars that he plans to sell one at a time as a source of nontraceable cash. Arthur is going off the grid to find his wife’s killer.
Arthur displays an impressive talent in hacking computer systems and more knowledge than I would have expected from a research nerd in dealing with underworld thugs, all while coming to terms with his own changed physical abilities.
Reviewers loved this book. It received starred reviews from the big four: Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, Booklist, and Library Journal. It was one of Publishers Weekly Top Twelve Mystery/Thrillers of 2012 and on the list of Kirkus Best Fiction of 2012. It also received the 2013 Nero Award. I can see why: it is an original and entertaining story. Highly recommended.



·         Hardcover: 248 pages
·         Publisher: The Permanent Press (September 15, 2012)
·         Language: English
·         ISBN-10: 1579622836
·         ISBN-13: 978-1579622831



Aubrey Hamilton ©2019

Aubrey Hamilton is a former librarian who works on Federal It projects by day and reads mysteries at night.

Sunday, September 08, 2019

RTE Update: RTE for September 7, 2019

The September 2019 issue of RTE is out and includes fifteen new reviews
and a new interview.


Our guest in the "Sixty Seconds" spot this week is Terry Shames:


_REVIEWS THIS WEEK_:



THE SECOND BIGGEST NOTHING     Colin Cotterill    Reviewed by Barbara Fister

THE CHURCHGOER    Patrick Coleman    Reviewed by Susan Hoover

THE CHESTNUT MAN    Søren Sveistrup    Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

THE WHISPER MAN    Alex North     Reviewed by Cathy Downs

THE MISSING ONES    Edwin Hill      Reviewed by Meredith Frazier

TELL ME EVERYTHING    Cambria Brockman     Reviewed by Cathy Downs

THE GOOD COP    Peter Steiner     Reviewed by Yvonne Klein

FAKE    John DeDakis     Reviewed by Anne Corey

NEVER LOOK BACK    Alison Gaylin     Reviewed by Keshena Hanson

DEATH IN A DESERT LAND    Andrew Wilson     Reviewed by Meredith Frazier

A LADY'S GUIDE TO GOSSIP    Dianne Freeman     Reviewed by PJ Coldren
AND MURDER

AND THEN THERE WERE CRUMBS    Eve Calder     Reviewed by Diana Borse

JEALOUSY FILLED DONUTS    Ginger Bolton     Reviewed by PJ Coldren

THE TIME FOR MURDER IS MEOW    T.C. LoTempio    Reviewed by Ruth Castleberry

We post more than 900 new reviews a year -- all of them are archived on
the site -- as well as a new interview with a top author every issue.

Yvonne Klein